Health

Critical Access Hospital Serves Crisis Patients Faster with Technology

By Taylor Crouch

Abbeville Area Medical Center uses telehealth to improve access to care for behavioral health patients.

Abbeville Area Medical Center is remotely located, over an hour from two larger South Carolina hubs, Greenville and Columbia.  Inside the hospital, there are less than 25 beds. Remote access and quantity of beds quailify Abbeville Area Medical Center as a Critical Access Hospital (CAH), making it one of five in South Carolina.

Even though this hospital provides emergent care 24/7, it is unfeasible to staff certain specialists full-time for services that are seldom needed, like a psychiatrist. 

Keeping Safe in the Summer Sun

By Kaitlyn Park

girl receiving sunscreen from mother

It is hardly breaking news to anyone that it is hot in South Carolina this summer. So hot, in fact, that the famous carriage horses were being pulled off of Charleston streets earlier this week.

As many head to the lake, beach and park, it is important to know how to keep you and your family safe and protected in the sun.

The Columbia Floods and the Problem with Impervious Surfaces

By Imani King

The Columbia floods and the Impervious Problem

The word catastrophic was coined to describe the 2015 floods in Columbia, South Carolina. The severe flooding trapped residents in their homes, standing by for rescue teams' assistance. Photos from the Weather Channel compare normal conditions to flood conditions and the difference is alarming. The flood that reaped havoc two years ago has left a stain of concern among the students of the University of South Carolina and of the capital city.

Kindbelly

By Sean Flynn

Kindbelly

Kindbelly is a healthy alternative for both breakfast and lunch in Myrtle Beach, SC. Their cafe serves organic kombucha on tap, smoothies with locally sourced, organic microgreens, wraps, salads, acai and pitaya bowls, as well as a small hot menu from their grill.

Drug Monitoring Law To Fight Opioid Abuse

By Gavin Jackson

Gov. McMaster signs the bill into law on Tuesday, June 6, 2017.

All opioids prescribed in South Carolina are now required to be reported to the state monitoring program, thanks to a bill that Gov. Henry McMaster signed into law last month.

The law is one of several pieces of legislation lawmakers pushed this year as they work to stymie the deadly opioid and heroin epidemic. Officials hope the new law will slow the growth of the problem, which is rooted in prescription painkiller abuse.

Country Doctor Finds 'Prosperity' in Telehealth

By Taylor Crouch

Oscar Lovelace provides health services in Prosperity, South Carolina.

Almost thirty years ago, Dr. Oscar Lovelace opened his practice in Prosperity, South Carolina, hoping to provide more care in its rural setting.

As a native to Columbia, South Carolina, and Graduate of both Clemson and the Medical University of South Carolina, Lovelace knew early on that he wanted to be a rural doctor.

Teacher Saves Time and Money with Virtual Doctor Visit

By Taylor Crouch

A teacher scrolls through questions on a Smart Exam.

In an effort to improve access to care, hospitals across the state offer virtual exams for non-emergent needs.

Virtual exams, like Greenville Health System’s (GHS) Smart Exam, enable patients to register and complete a guided questionnaire, to be reviewed by a local provider who then offers a treatment plan.

My Telehealth Shares Voices of the Community

By Marina Ziehe

Thank you

In 2016, the My Telehealth campaign was born with a simple goal: to raise awareness about telehealth, which means the delivery of healthcare via different types of technology. 

Chester County Farm Raises All-Natural Products

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Thames Farm in Fort Lawn, SC.

“I love meeting people of the community and having them come back and tell me, ‘I loved your pork chops, I love your sausages…we get so satisfied when we eat it, your chicken seems to go further than what I get from the grocery store…I love your eggs, my cakes are better.’ That’s just, that’s a big deal to me because I know that they are satisfied with what I’m doing, so what I’m doing must be right,” says Amy Thames, owner of

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