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The Outdoor Dream Foundation

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. While reading the Department of Natural Resource’s award-winning magazine, South Carolina Wildlife, I learned about a remarkable organization that DNR partners with.

Tavi's Four in One

By Sean Flynn

Tavi's Four in One

We were joined on the set of "Making It Grow" by Suzy Ellison of the SC Department of Agriculture's SC Specialty Food Association. This statewide organization is dedicated to promoting the specialty food products available in the Palmetto state. The guest this evening was Gordon Carle from Tavi's Four in One and their multipurpose condiment.

The Edgefield Camellia Tea

By Sean Flynn

Camellias

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of "Making It Grow" Amanda McNulty travels to Edgefield, SC and talks with Henrietta Humphreys about the city's history of camellias and about their annual Camellia Tea.

Grafting Citrus Trees

By Sean Flynn

Oranges

Stan McKenzie of McKenzie Farms in Scranton, SC joins us at "Making It Grow" and shows us how to graft citrus trees. On his farm, Stan grows over 40 varieties of cold hardy citrus. In the studio, Stan demonstrates with Clemson Extension Agent Tony Melton on how he grafts some of his citrus plants.

Poinsettias

By Sean Flynn

Poinsettias

Clemson professor and poinsettia expert Dr. Jim Faust joins us at "Making It Grow" and shares tips on selecting and caring for poinsettias, as well as a little history about the plant and how it came to America. Dr. Faust also brought some new varieties and historical varieties to show.

Uses for Basswood

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Tilia americana has the common names of linden or basswood. Basswood, b a s s is a corruption of bast – b a s t. Bast is the fibers from the phloem of woody plants, the outer layer of the vascular system. If you search a plant at NRCS Plant Guide, you get the North American ethnobotanical uses of the plant. :    Native Americans and settlers used the fibrous inner bark ("bast") as a source of fiber for rope, mats, fish nets, and baskets.

Tilia Americana

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The genus Tilia sometimes has lots of species associated with it, but the AC Moore Herbarium’s SC Plant Atlas lists just one in South Carolina, Tilia americana with several subspecies following it. This tree is the only member of the Malvacea family in North America, and notes I found said that the buds are edible but mucilaginous – okra famously for its slimy potential is also in that family.

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