Home

Fall Color in Southern Red Maple Trees

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow logoHello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Last week we got out the wool blankets, fortunately I haven’t seen any new holes since I packed them carefully with moth balls at the end of last winter. One of the delights of cooler temperatures besides snuggling under the cover is the colors that we see in nature. As I drive across the Congaree River floodplain, some of the deciduous trees, including the bald cypress, are beginning to show color. Although people go to Maine specially to see the sugar maple trees, our southern red maples are not reliably worth a...

Mustard Greens

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow logoHello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . When my mother felt a little low in energy, she’d say, “I need some Lexington County tender greens, which are a type of mustard green. These come from Brassica juncea, a different species than the collards and kales, and originated in western or central Asia. In parts of the world, varying cultivars of mustard greens are used for different purposes, including collecting the seeds to make brown mustard, which is more pungent in flavor than yellow mustard. The seeds are also used to make a cooking oil, which is...

SOMEWHERE SOUTH, A New Series with Award-Winning Television Host and Chef Vivian Howard

By Don Godish

SOMEWHERE SOUTH host and chef Vivian Howard with Chef Mike LeePREMIERES MARCH 27, 2020 at 9:00 p.m. Celebrity chef, author and restaurateur Vivian Howard, who previously hosted the award-winning series A CHEF’S LIFE, returns to PBS in SOMEWHERE SOUTH . The new six-part series is a culinary tour, exploring dishes that are uniting cultures and creating new traditions across the American South. In SOMEWHERE SOUTH , premiering on PBS in Winter/Spring 2020, Vivian travels the changing South in search of the dishes that connect us all — dumplings, hand pies, porridge and more — but which are expressed in delightfully different ways across cultures. Along the...

Wild Cabbages?

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow logoHello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Collards and kale are considered wild type members of the cabbage family. These species of the Brassica genus originated in the Mediterranean area, where they were eaten by the Romans and Greeks two thousand years ago. As the Roman Empire expanded, they were introduced into southwest Europe and even England. Cato the Elder, a Roman senator and historian living roughly 200 years before the Christian era, also had an interest in agriculture. He believed that that the wild brassicas growing in the then Roman state...

Origin of "Greens"

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow logoHello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Tony Melton told us recently that the greens which were planted months ago are sitting in the field waiting for rain. Well, we’ve finally gotten that much needed heavenly precipitation, and from Tony's extensive knowledge, our South Carolina collards and kale should quickly rebound from their slow start. Staples of southern cooking, collards are thought by some to be of African origin as they were a large part of the traditional African-American and by extension Southern cuisine. But actually, these plants are...

Invasion of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs!

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow logoHello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . We’ve had ninety degree temperatures in October, but during a brief cool spell in September, one of the worst imported pests, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, started its annual intrusion into my upstairs. I awoke one morning to find these garden pests hanging out on my curtains and Edward had to suck them up with the vacuum, then empty the canister into a bag, seal it, and put it in the trash. If you disturb them by picking or sweeping them up, they give off an absolutely disgustingly smelly secretion. I found one...

The Dairy Heifer Project

By Sean Flynn

kids feeding cowsThe Heifer Dairy Project began in 1974 and was designed to provide boys and girls who have non-dairy backgrounds an opportunity to raise a dairy heifer and experience the dairy industry. We follow 4H 12 year old twin girls Madelyn and Logan Bolin of Clover, SC as they first receive their cows at the Clemson Spring Dairy Weekend. Then, we visit them over the summer to see the day to day responsibilities for caring for the cows. Finally, we watch them compete in the SC State Fair Dairy Cow Show and also as they auction off their cows they received the previous year.

Fall Favorites

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow logoHello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . This time of year I’m reminded of fixing flowers for the happy second marriage of a friend because I used a native and an imported flower that are flowering right now. Both of them seem to pop up overnight. The native plant was Farewell to Summer which grows in sandy, dry soils. The imported plant was red spider lily and has been a staple of Southern gardens for hundreds of years and persists unless its foliage gets mowed down too often. Spider lily, Lycoris radiata, flowers before the leaves emerge, the...

Farm to School at Briggs Elementary

By Sean Flynn

Farm to School at Briggs Elementary"Making It Grow" visits Briggs Elementary School in Florence, SC to learn more about Farm at Briggs. While holding chickens, Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and teacher Jeff Murrie talk about the garden and its purpose. Amanda also talks to the students about what they have learned and what they have enjoyed about working in the garden. Mr. Murrie is also a graduate of Clemson Extension’s School Gardening for SC Educators which is a horticulture-based program designed to help SC educators grow successful school gardens to address childhood obesity and improve academic outcomes.

The McLeod Farms Corn Maze "Amazers"

By Sean Flynn

The McLeod Farms Corn Maze "Amazers"Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty travels to McBee, SC and McLeod Farms and talks Spencer McLeod on how they grow and cut the corn to achieve the planned design in their corn maze. This year’s design is a super-hero theme called “Amazers”!

Pages