Culture

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Impact of the New Deal

By Alfred Turner

A mural entitled "Past and Present Agriculture and Industry of Colleton County" painted by Sheffield Kagy in 1938 When the stock market crashed in 1929, ushering in the Great Depression, South Carolina was already in dire financial straits. Cotton prices had plummeted, even before the boll weevil had decimated the crop. Years of non-sustainable practices in cotton farming had ruined thousands of acres of farmland. And, the textile industry had crashed. Then came Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, which altered the physical, social, and economic landscape of South Carolina. In the second of our programs on South Carolina Between the World Wars , Dr. Kerry Taylor, a specialist in twentieth-century...

President's Corner Monthly Newsletter, January 2020

By Anthony Padgett

SanditionDear Viewers and Listeners: Happy New Year! This month the SC Legislature goes back into session, and we continue our mission of transparency with the annual broadcast of State House Today, airing on ETV World and streamed on our web site. Airing Tuesday-Thursday, the programs bring viewers live, real time feeds of House and Senate sessions, beginning Jan. 14. On SC Public Radio, State House Week winds up the week’s happenings with a Friday broadcast; and the podcast SC Lede , accessed on our website and through the ETV app, offers an in-depth discussion of the week’s biggest topics. Music...

"H" is for H.L. Hunley

By Alfred Turner

South Carolina From A to ZCredit SC Public Radio "H" is for H.L. Hunley . On the night of February 17, 1864, the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley attacked and sank the USS Housatonic about four miles off Sullivan’s Island. This was the first successful sinking of an enemy ship by submersible in the history of the world. Constructed in Mobile, Alabama, and named for one of its owners, the iron vessel was forty feet long, five feet tall, and four feet wide. It was transported to Charleston with the hopes that it would help break the Union naval blockade of the port. The attack on the Union warship was successful, but...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Great Depression

By Alfred Turner

Lewis Hinter with his family on Lady's Island off Beaufort, South Carolina, 1936Following World War I, South Carolina’s economy collapsed. The post-World-War-I drop in demand for textiles, the subsequent collapse in cotton prices, the exhaustion of farmland through poor farming practices, and the decimation of cotton crops by the boll weevil hit South Carolinians hard. Then came the stock market crash on Black Thursday in 1929 and the nation’s plunge into the Great Depression. People were starving, businesses were failing, farms were being repossessed, and sharecroppers were squeezed between the need to grow their own food and their landlords’ demands. Dr. Melissa Walker...

South Carolina State University: A Black Land-Grant College in Jim Crow America

By Alfred Turner

S.C. State University logoCredit S.C. State Since its founding in 1896, South Carolina State University has provided vocational, undergraduate, and graduate education for generations of African Americans. Now the state’s flagship historically black university, it achieved this recognition after decades of struggling against poverty, inadequate infrastructure and funding, and social and cultural isolation. In South Carolina State University: A Black Land-Grant College in Jim Crow America , William C. Hine examines South Carolina State’s complicated start, its slow and long-overdue transition to a degree-granting...

Significant Flash Flood Risk Today and Tonight

By Jeff Huffman

map of south carolina showing flood zonesUpdate as of 10:30 AM Monday: Heavy rain has overspread much of the Palmetto State and it’s expected to last into early Tuesday morning resulting in a significant risk for flash flooding. The National Weather Service has continued Flash Flood Watches for the Midlands, Pee Dee, Grand Strand, and Lowcountry. Radar data and rain gauges throughout the state have recorded between 1 and 3 inches of rain since the storm began earlier Sunday. Parts of the Midlands and Lowcountry have received upwards of 4 inches. An additional 3 to 5 inches of rain along and east of Interstate 95 are expected before...

Second Half of the Weekend Likely a Washout

By Ray Hawthorne

Rainfall Sunday into MondaySwaths of heavy rain are expected to spread across the Palmetto State over the weekend. The rain will be heavy enough to cause river and street flooding, but there are still questions as to which parts of the state will see the greatest amounts. An area of low pressure is forecast to form in the central Gulf of Mexico and gradually strengthen as it moves northeastward over the Southeastern United States. The first area to receive widespread heavy rain is likely to be the Lowcountry Saturday night into Sunday morning, spreading over the remainder of the state Sunday afternoon through Sunday...

Of Red Eyes and Blue Skies: Thomas Palmer's Wind Chamber Works

By Bradley Fuller

photo of Thomas Palmer smilingLate nights are a frustrating fact of life for many musicians. Too often, the time after sundown is all that remains for performing, practicing, working against an upcoming deadline, or agonizing over an artistic quandary. But for composer Thomas Palmer, a senior studying composition and clarinet performance at the Unviersity of South Carolina School of Music, there’s inspiration to be found even in the drudgery of a sleep-deprived state. His reed quintet Red-Eye (2019), recently published by Murphy Music Press, is a musical representation of staying up late. “It’s not about a late-night...

The Angel Tree

By Brandie Perron

angel treeDuring the holiday season, the iconic red kettle is synonymous with the Salvation Army. Did you know that it’s been around since the late 1800s? Captain Joseph McFee started the tradition in 1891 to help to provide a free Christmas dinner for those in need. Today these donations do much more, from providing food and shelter to struggling families throughout the year, to helping provide a Christmas dinner for “Angels” and their families. The Angel Tree program helps put new clothes and toys under the tree for one million children nationwide who usually have to go without Christmas gifts. The...

Mary Whyte's "We the People" at City Gallery

By Libby Dallis

We the People: Portraits of Veterans in AmericaIn 2010, internationally renowned artist Mary Whyte set out on an inspirational seven-year mission to paint fifty large-scale watercolor portraits of current-day American veterans. On October 25, ETV captured the opening reception of this extraordinary exhibit and some of the veterans’ reactions to their paintings. We The People: Portraits of Veterans in America will continue to be on view through December 22 at City Gallery in Charleston, S.C. This is a remarkable series depicting military veterans of all ages and in all walks of life – culminating in a timeless portrait of and for the...

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