SC History

Martyr of the American Revolution: The Execution of Isaac Hayne

December 3, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
American Flag from the Revolutionary War

(Originally broadcast 06/08/18) - Martyr of the American Revolution: The Execution of Isaac Hayne, South Carolinian (2017, USC Press) examines the events that set an American militia colonel on a disastrous collision course with two British officers, his execution in...

Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection

November 8, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Detail from Art Studio, by Thereas Pollak.

Spanning the decades between the late 1890s and early 1960s, The Johnson Collection’s new exhibition and its companion book, Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection, examine the particularly complex challenges Southern women artists...

Uncompromising Activist: Richard Greener, First Black Professor at USC

October 29, 2018 - Posted in Education by Alfred Turner
Richard T. Greener, circa 1900; by J. H. Cunningham. In The Colored American, February 24, 1900.

Richard T. Greener, circa 1900; by J. H. Cunningham. In The Colored American, February 24, 1900. Credit The Colored American, February 24, 1900 / Library of Congress/Chronicling America (Originally broadcast 06/01/18) - Richard Theodore Greener (1844–1922) was a renowned...

SCETV's In-Depth Look at the Folklore Surrounding "Alice" of the Hermitage

October 23, 2018 - Posted in Palmetto Scene by Brandie Perron
Alice's Grave Marker In All Saints Cemetery

More than 150 years ago, the legend of Alice Flagg of the Hermitage began. This young lady from the banks of the inlet in Georgetown County has touched the lives of many, including the Chandler boys – who grew up sleeping in Alice’s room. Variations to the history are...

My Tour Through the Asylum: a Southern Integrationist's Memoir

October 15, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Dr. William Dufford

(Originally broadcast 04/06/18) - Immortalized in the writings of his most famous student, best-selling author Pat Conroy, veteran education administrator William E. Dufford has led an the life of a stalwart champion for social justice and equal access for all to the...

Pat Conroy: My Exaggerated Life

October 1, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Pat Conroy and Katherine Clark

Pat Conroy’s memoirs and autobiographical novels contain a great deal about his life, but there is much he hasn’t revealed with readers until now. My Exaggerated Life (2018, University of South Carolina Press) is the product of a special collaboration between this great...

Slave Cabin

September 26, 2018 - Posted in Expeditions by Patrick McMillan
Slave Cabin

Located on an antebellum plantation near the coast of South Carolina is an abandoned slave cabin in which Naturalist Patrick McMillan discovers wildlife now making a home. Expeditions with Patrick McMillan is presented nationally by South Carolina ETV through American...

Liberia, South Carolina: An African American Appalachian Community

September 17, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Soapstone Baptist Church sign, Liberia, S.C.

In 2007, while researching mountain culture in upstate South Carolina, anthropologist John M. Coggeshall stumbled upon the small community of Liberia in the Blue Ridge foothills. There he met Mable Owens Clarke and her family, the remaining members of a small African...

Crossroads: Change in Rural America

September 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
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Crossroads: Change in Rural America is a traveling Smithsonian exhibit that offers small towns a chance to look at their own paths and to highlight the changes that affected their fortunes over the past century. Sponsored by SC Humanities in partnership with local...

Introducing "History in a Nutshell" on Knowitall.org

August 30, 2018 - Posted in Education by Andrew Davis
History In A Nutshell Logo

Progress with History In A Nutshell is finally moving forward! With the success of the first two episodes, World War I and the 1918 Flu Pandemic in South Carolina , more content is on the way. Episode three will cover what happens right after the American Revolution...

Black South Carolinians, Soldiers in World War I

August 13, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.

(Originally broadcast 02/23/18) - Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war...

Preserving History: The Olympia Mill Village Museum Opens September 28

July 24, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Clayton Sears
A four-year journey: Jake and Sherry Jaco inside the Olympia Mill school during the construction phase of the museum

Columbia has a rich history of being a cotton/textile mill town. The Olympia and Granby Mills are located just outside of the downtown area, next to the Congaree river. Like many places in Columbia, this historic area is growing. The Olympia-Granby Historical Foundation was...

Journalist Robert Cox and the Newspaper That Published Dangerous Truths

July 20, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Robert Cox (with Maria Hinojosa, WGBH, Boston)

(Originally broadcast 01/19/18) - The Buenos Aires Herald ceased publication in July of 2017, almost 141 years after its founding. The paper became famous, however, only in the latter part of the 20th century, for exposing the forced disappearances of Argentinians during...

Parks Tell Unheard Stories of the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution

July 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
John Slaughter, Superintendent of US Park Service's Southern Campaign of the American Revolution Parks group.

(Originally broadcast 10/13/17) - The Southern Campaign was critical in determining the outcome of the American Revolutionary War, yet the South’s importance has been downplayed in most historical accounts to date. The National Park Service has recognized the importance of...

SCETV Endowment, Southern Campaign Tour, Stop 4 - Kings Mountain

May 30, 2018 - Posted in Behind the Scenes by Andrew Davis
Here, patriot militiamen won a crucial victory against the British.

The final stop on the SC ETV Endowment's Southern Campaign Tour was Kings Mountain National Battlefield. Kings Mountain is a rocky, wooded hill on the border of North and South Carolina. This site also played host to several U.S. Presidents: President Herbert Hoover spoke...

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