SC History

Maude Callen | SC Hall of Fame

March 12, 2020 - Posted in History by Jackie Johnson
Maude Callen

This episode is about Maude Callen (1898 -- 1990), a Nurse-Midwife, who singlehandedly brought health care to rural Pineville, S.C. and the surrounding area of Berkeley County in the early 1920s, continuing to the 1970s. The episode will tell how she delivered some 800...

Georgia O’Keeffe: A Woman on Paper

March 5, 2020 - Posted in Culture
American artist Georgia O’Keeffe

American artist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) has been called the “Mother of American Modernism,” well-known for her flowing, colorful works of flowers and plants as well as Southwestern landscapes. In November 2014, her painting Jimson Weed, White Flower No. 1 was auctioned...

Anna Hyatt Huntington | SC Hall of Fame

March 5, 2020 - Posted in History
Anna Hyatt Huntington

Born in 1876, Anna Vaughn Hyatt came from a family that supported her interest in animals and the arts. Her mother and sister were both artists. Her father was a professor of paleontology, and she developed a scientist's power of observation. In 1902 she went to New York to...

Horse Racing and Horse Culture in South Carolina and Beyond

March 2, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Currier & Ives & Cameron, J. (ca. 1884) An exciting finish

According to the South Carolina Encyclopedia, “’The Sport of Kings’ emerged in South Carolina as soon as colonists gained firm footing and began amassing property and wealth enough to emulate the lifestyles of England and the Caribbean.” Horse racing and horse culture...

The Charleston Church Massacre and the Journey to Forgiveness

February 28, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
The scene outside Emanuel A.M.E. Church, Charleston, SC, on Sunday morning, July 21, 2015.

On June 17, 2015, twelve members of the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina welcomed a young white man to their evening Bible study. He arrived with a pistol, 88 bullets, and hopes of starting a race war. Dylann Roof’s massacre of nine...

Mary McLeod Bethune | SC Hall of Fame

February 20, 2020 - Posted in History by Jackie Johnson
Mary McLeod Bethune

If there were a Mount Rushmore for African-Americans, Mary McLeod Bethune would definitely be on there. She is hailed as one of the most influential African-American educators and Civil Rights figures, during the first half of the 20th century. Mary Jane McLeod Bethune was...

David Drake aka “Dave the Potter” | SC Hall of Fame

February 6, 2020 - Posted in History
Dave the Potter

David Drake was an enslaved African American in Edgefield, South Carolina during the first three quarters of the nineteenth century. He’s known today for the magnificent quality of the pots he made, the size of the pots, and he wrote poems on some of his pots—during an era...

Andrew Pickens | SC Hall of Fame

January 30, 2020 - Posted in History
Andrew Pickens

Watch an eight minute biography of the life of American Revolution militia leader and US Congressman, General Andrew Pickens. Through the use of available archival materials, scholar interviews, and historical illustrations this program details Pickens' military...

Ronald Erwin McNair | SC Hall of Fame

January 28, 2020 - Posted in History
Ronald Erwin McNair

Inducted into the South Carolina Hall Of Fame, Ronald McNair was the second African-American to go into space, and was part of the STS-51L crew that died when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after lift-off in January 28, 1986.

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Beginnings of Black Activism

January 27, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.

Black South Carolinians, despite poverty and discrimination, began to organize and lay the basis for the civil rights movement that would occur after World War II. Dr. Bobby Donaldson of the University of South Carolina talks about the efforts by black South Carolinians to...

Andrew Jackson | SC Hall of Fame

January 23, 2020 - Posted in History
Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson was born in Lancaster County, South Carolina in 1767. He fought in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. Jackson became a lawyer and moved to Nashville, Tennessee. He was the first Democrat elected U.S. President, serving from 1829-1837. During his...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Charleston Renaissance

January 20, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
"The Reserve in Summer" from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties, ca. 1935, By Alice Ravenel Huger Smith (American, 1876 - 1958); Watercolor on paper;

In the years after WWI, art, poetry, historic preservation, and literature flourished in Charleston, SC, and the Lowcountry during what has been called the Charleston Renaissance. Angela Mack, Executive Director & Chief Curator of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston...

South Carolina Between World Wars: Politics

January 13, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
James F. Byrnes. During his ten years in the Senate, Byrnes championed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal.

This week on Walter Edgar's Journal , our third program on South Carolina Between the World Wars , features Dr. Vernon Burton of Clemson University, in conversation with Walter Edgar about the politics of the period. During this time, State politics remained a politics very...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Impact of the New Deal

January 6, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
A mural entitled "Past and Present Agriculture and Industry of Colleton County" painted by Sheffield Kagy in 1938

When the stock market crashed in 1929, ushering in the Great Depression, South Carolina was already in dire financial straits. Cotton prices had plummeted, even before the boll weevil had decimated the crop. Years of non-sustainable practices in cotton farming had ruined...

"H" is for H.L. Hunley

December 30, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "H" is for H.L. Hunley . On the night of February 17, 1864, the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley attacked and sank the USS Housatonic about four miles off Sullivan’s Island. This was the first successful sinking of an enemy ship by submersible in the...

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