SC History

"M' is for Mill Schools

April 3, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Mill Schools. Textile mill executives surrounded their mills with villages and most provided schools to educate the children of mill workers. The mill school was a reflection of the individual community and run with little interference or oversight by the state...

Historic Hangar Gets New Life

April 2, 2018 - Posted in Palmetto Scene by Lynn Cornfoot
Curtiss Wright hangar

When it comes to preserving a building on the National Register of Historic Places, time, money and effort are always part of the challenge. If restoration is possible, then history can teach, inspire and help to revitalize a local community.

"M" is for Militia

April 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “M” is for Militia. South Carolina’s early settlers brought with them the traditional English concept of a militia, the idea that every citizen had a duty to assist in the defense of the community. A 1671 ordinance required all men (sixteen to sixty)...

"M" is for Military Education

March 30, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Military Education. Since the antebellum period, southerners have regarded military education as an excellent way to instill self-discipline, integrity, patriotism, moral virtue, and a sense of civic duty in youths, particularly young men. The South Carolina...

"L" is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779)

March 29, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779). Signer of the Declaration of Independence. A native of Prince George Winyah Parish, Lynch attended the Indigo Society School. He then travelled to England where he was schooled at Eton and then Caius College...

"L" is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882)

March 28, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882). Clergyman, diplomat. Lynch was born in Ireland. His family immigrated to South Carolina in 1819 and settled in Cheraw. Bishop John England educated Lynch in his boys’ academy in Charleston and then sent...

An Archaeology of Life in Charleston

March 26, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Trowel at an archaeological dig.

(Originally broadcast 12/01/2017) - In Charleston: An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community (2016, University Press of Florida), Martha Zierden, Curator of Historical Archaeology at The Charleston Museum; and, Dr. Betsy Reitz, University of Georgia Athens, weave...

Camp Croft

March 15, 2018 - Posted in SCETV Regionals by William Richardson
Camp Croft

Camp Croft, a WWII Army Infantry Replacement Center located near Spartanburg, SC. Since 2001, this site has served to honor those who worked and trained at Croft from 1940 to 1946 and to memorialize all US military service personnel who have lost their lives in pursuit of...

South Carolina Flag Not Official

February 23, 2018 - Posted in Palmetto Scene by Ann Bailey
SC flag

Most South Carolinians find unique points of pride within their state—sweet tea, coastal wildlife, and shag-dancing are staples of its culture. Additionally, many South Carolina residents are particularly proud of a famed symbol: its flag. A white crescent rests in...

The Military in South Carolina in World War I

February 9, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Camp Jackson

Dr. Andrew Myers from the University of South Carolina Upstate joins Dr. Edgar for a public Conversation on South Carolina History, World War I: S.C. and the Military , on January 23, 2018. It was part of a series presented in January and February, 2018, and sponsored by...

Orangeburg Massacre: A Conversation with Henry Smith's Sister

February 8, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Beryl Dakers
Ora Sue Smith Hughes

Ora Sue Smith Hughes shares memories about her brother, Henry Smith (1948-1968), one of the three slain victims in the Orangeburg Massacre. South Carolina State College student Henry Smith had an interest in the growing civil rights movement, admiring leaders like Martin...

Orangeburg Massacre: South Carolina and National Response to Tragedy

February 8, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Beryl Dakers
Police officers with guns

Representative James E. Clyburn sits down with South Carolina ETV to talk about the country and South Carolina's response to the Orangeburg Massacre. Clyburn also compares how the Kent State shooting of 1970, which occurred two years after the Orangeburg Massacre, received...

The Orangeburg Massacre: Alumni Discuss Lifelong Effects and the FBI Investigation

February 8, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Ty Moody
Fifty years later,  SC State University Alumni gather for a conversation about the lifelong effects of the Orangeburg Massacre a

Fifty years later, South Carolina State University (SCSU) Alumni gather for a conversation about the lifelong effects of the Orangeburg Massacre and the final FBI investigation report. On the evening of February 8, 1968, SCSU students started a bonfire on the front of...

David Drake aka “Dave the Potter”

February 8, 2018 - Posted in SC Hall of Fame
Dave the Potter

David Drake was an enslaved African American in Edgefield, South Carolina during the first three quarters of the nineteenth century. He’s known today for the magnificent quality of the pots he made, the size of the pots, and he wrote poems on some of his pots—during an era...

The Orangeburg Massacre 50 Years Later: Remembrances

February 7, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Ty Moody
SC State University Alumni gather for a conversation about the tragic event that occurred on February 8, 1968.

South Carolina State University (SCSU) Alumni gather for a conversation about the tragic event that occurred on February 8, 1968. Fifty years ago, SCSU students started a bonfire on the front of campus which is located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. As police and...

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