History

Country Music

October 5, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
Dwight Yoakam plays a Martin D-28 guitar. Yoakam is among the 76 of the 101 country music artists interviewed for the series who signed two Martin D-28 guitars.

Since its first publication in 1968, Bill C. Malone’s Country Music USA has won universal acclaim as the definitive history of American country music. Starting with the music’s folk roots in the rural South, it traces country music from the early days of radio into the...

For Black Women, the 19th Amendment was the Beginning of a Long Fight for Voting Rights

September 14, 2020 - Posted in History by Victoria Hansen
African American women and men carry signs calling for equal rights in 1963 more than 40 years after the 19th ammendent was pass

The 19th amendment promised women the right to vote would not be denied because of gender. But it was an empty promise for women with dark skin. "It's an historical legacy that can't be ignored because it's inconvenient," says Sandra Slater. She's an associate history...

The Glories of Grits

August 31, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
The Glories of Grits

Grits. If you grew up in the South, you have likely eaten them. If you buy yours from the grocery store, though, you may never have really tasted the goodness of stone ground grits. This week, Walter Edgar talks grits with Greg Johnsman, of Geechee Boy Mills on Edisto...

Charleston Suffragist Helped Save Historic Architecture

August 25, 2020 - Posted in History by Victoria Hansen
Miles Brewton house on King Street where Susan Pringle Frost was born and later returned to live out the rest of her life.

Susan Pringle Frost was born to a prominent Charleston family and seemed destined for a life of leisure until her father's fertilizer business fell apart after the Civil War. She left boarding school to help her family, first by working as a secretary for an architect and...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Impact of the New Deal

August 14, 2020 - Posted in History by Walter Edgar
A mural entitled "Past and Present Agriculture and Industry of Colleton County" painted by Sheffield Kagy in 1938

When the stock market crashed in 1929, ushering in the Great Depression, South Carolina was already in dire financial straits. Cotton prices had plummeted, even before the boll weevil had decimated the crop. Years of non-sustainable practices in cotton farming had ruined...

Ups and Downs: South Carolina’s Economy During World War I

August 7, 2020 - Posted in History by Mark Smith
Spinners and doffers in Lancaster Cotton Mills. Lancaster, S.C., circa 1912.

South Carolina in 1918 was still struggling with the changes to its economic and social systems brought about by the Civil War and Reconstruction. The United States’ entry into World War I affected the daily work life of South Carolinians and the state’s economy in a way...

Charleston Sisters' Aversion to Slavery Fuels Fight for Women's Rights

August 4, 2020 - Posted in History by Victoria Hansen
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Lee Ann Bain talks excitedly as she darts from the sun to the shade along Charleston's sweltering city streets. There's hardly a bead of sweat forming on her face. Bain knows how to beat the heat. She's been giving walking tours for 11 years. Bain remembers studying to...

Fighting on Two Fronts: Black South Carolinians in World War I

July 20, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat

Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war was a way to prove their...

Conversations on S.C. History: Women and World War I

July 3, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
Detail from a poster showing a Red Cross nurse with an American flag and the Red Cross symbol.

Prior to that World War I, South Carolina was a predominantly rural state, with a Black majority populaltion. The typical S.C. woman in 1916 was Black, and, if she was employed, she was likely an agricultural worker or a domestic worker. If she was White, a working woman...

Calhoun Statue Overlooking Charleston Takes Time to Come Down

June 25, 2020 - Posted in History by Victoria Hansen
People rush to see the face of John C. Calhoun as the statue is taken down after more than 124 years.  June 24, 2020

It’s been nearly impossible to see the face of John C. Calhoun perched atop a more than 100- foot pedestal over the Charleston city skyline for 124 years, but now the likeness of the South Carolina statesman is gone. It took time to take down. Calhoun was a former State...

Reconstruction and the African American Struggle for Equality in the South

June 22, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
The first black U.S. senator and first black House members were elected by Southern states during Reconstruction.

Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., has said, "Reconstruction is one of the most important and consequential chapters in American history. It is also among the most overlooked, misunderstood and misrepresented." For an overview of this fraught era in American history, Dr. Walter...

What Does Freedom Mean? The Agency of Black People Before and After Emancipation

June 17, 2020 - Posted in History by Walter Edgar
Juneteenth Celebration, Texas 1905

On June 19th, 1865, Union general Gordon Granger read federal orders in Galveston, Texas, that all previously enslaved people in Texas were free. The news of Emancipation had finally come to the state. Today, this day is celebrated as Juneteenth. What did it mean to these...

Local initiative created to record history of COVID-19 pandemic

May 20, 2020 - Posted in News by Leslie Leonard
Local initiative created to record history of COVID-19 pandemic

“This pandemic has made known cracks and faults in the state of South Carolina, relating to education and health disparities,” says Michael Allen, a board member on the S.C. African American Heritage Commission. “Things that were once hidden are in plain view.” Black...

Reclaiming a Lost Hero of World War II

May 18, 2020 - Posted in History by Alfred Turner
Tarawa, Kiribati - U.S. Marines storm Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. The battle (November 20-23, 1943) was one of the bloodiest of WWII.

In November 1943, Marine 1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman, Jr. was mortally wounded while leading a successful assault on a critical Japanese fortification on the Pacific atoll of Tarawa, and posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor. The brutal...

Cheraw | Our Town

April 14, 2020 - Posted in Local by Charles Dymock
OUR TOWN | Cheraw

Cheraw is a quaint town that lies on the banks of the Great Pee Dee River. It’s a town known for its history and hospitality, that’s home to generations of local “Cheravians.” Victoria Lowery, a resident of Cheraw, recalls her childhood saying, “When I think about growing...

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