History

Charleston Sisters' Aversion to Slavery Fuels Fight for Women's Rights

August 4, 2020 - Posted in History by Victoria Hansen
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Charleston City Tour Guide Lee Ann Bain shares pictures of the Grimke family as part of her tour on the sisters. Bain is the president of the Charleston Tour Association. Credit Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio Lee Ann Bain talks excitedly as she darts from the sun to the...

Fighting on Two Fronts: Black South Carolinians in World War I

July 20, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat

Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war was a way to prove their...

Conversations on S.C. History: Women and World War I

July 3, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
Detail from a poster showing a Red Cross nurse with an American flag and the Red Cross symbol.

Prior to that World War I, South Carolina was a predominantly rural state, with a Black majority populaltion. The typical S.C. woman in 1916 was Black, and, if she was employed, she was likely an agricultural worker or a domestic worker. If she was White, a working woman...

Calhoun Statue Overlooking Charleston Takes Time to Come Down

June 25, 2020 - Posted in History by Victoria Hansen
People rush to see the face of John C. Calhoun as the statue is taken down after more than 124 years.  June 24, 2020

It’s been nearly impossible to see the face of John C. Calhoun perched atop a more than 100- foot pedestal over the Charleston city skyline for 124 years, but now the likeness of the South Carolina statesman is gone. It took time to take down. Calhoun was a former State...

Reconstruction and the African American Struggle for Equality in the South

June 22, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
The first black U.S. senator and first black House members were elected by Southern states during Reconstruction.

Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., has said, "Reconstruction is one of the most important and consequential chapters in American history. It is also among the most overlooked, misunderstood and misrepresented." For an overview of this fraught era in American history, Dr. Walter...

What Does Freedom Mean? The Agency of Black People Before and After Emancipation

June 17, 2020 - Posted in History by Walter Edgar
Juneteenth Celebration, Texas 1905

On June 19th, 1865, Union general Gordon Granger read federal orders in Galveston, Texas, that all previously enslaved people in Texas were free. The news of Emancipation had finally come to the state. Today, this day is celebrated as Juneteenth. What did it mean to these...

Local initiative created to record history of COVID-19 pandemic

May 20, 2020 - Posted in News by Leslie Leonard
Local initiative created to record history of COVID-19 pandemic

“This pandemic has made known cracks and faults in the state of South Carolina, relating to education and health disparities,” says Michael Allen, a board member on the S.C. African American Heritage Commission. “Things that were once hidden are in plain view.” Black...

Reclaiming a Lost Hero of World War II

May 18, 2020 - Posted in History by Alfred Turner
Tarawa, Kiribati - U.S. Marines storm Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. The battle (November 20-23, 1943) was one of the bloodiest of WWII.

In November 1943, Marine 1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman, Jr. was mortally wounded while leading a successful assault on a critical Japanese fortification on the Pacific atoll of Tarawa, and posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor. The brutal...

Cheraw | Our Town

April 14, 2020 - Posted in Local by Charles Dymock
OUR TOWN | Cheraw

Cheraw is a quaint town that lies on the banks of the Great Pee Dee River. It’s a town known for its history and hospitality, that’s home to generations of local “Cheravians.” Victoria Lowery, a resident of Cheraw, recalls her childhood saying, “When I think about growing...

Horse Racing and Horse Culture in South Carolina and Beyond

March 2, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Currier & Ives & Cameron, J. (ca. 1884) An exciting finish

According to the South Carolina Encyclopedia, “’The Sport of Kings’ emerged in South Carolina as soon as colonists gained firm footing and began amassing property and wealth enough to emulate the lifestyles of England and the Caribbean.” Horse racing and horse culture...

The Charleston Church Massacre and the Journey to Forgiveness

February 28, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
The scene outside Emanuel A.M.E. Church, Charleston, SC, on Sunday morning, July 21, 2015.

On June 17, 2015, twelve members of the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina welcomed a young white man to their evening Bible study. He arrived with a pistol, 88 bullets, and hopes of starting a race war. Dylann Roof’s massacre of nine...

College of Charleston Acknowledges its Past with the Center for the Study of Slavery

February 6, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Victoria Hansen
Dr. Bernard Powers founded the Center for the Study of Slavery at the College of Charleston

As the College of Charleston celebrates its 250th birthday, at its center is Randolph Hall. Built in 1820, students still gather here. Less prominent, an organization that tries to help the school comes to terms with its past, the Center for the Study of Slavery. "You are...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Beginnings of Black Activism

January 27, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.

Black South Carolinians, despite poverty and discrimination, began to organize and lay the basis for the civil rights movement that would occur after World War II. Dr. Bobby Donaldson of the University of South Carolina talks about the efforts by black South Carolinians to...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Charleston Renaissance

January 20, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
"The Reserve in Summer" from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties, ca. 1935, By Alice Ravenel Huger Smith (American, 1876 - 1958); Watercolor on paper;

In the years after WWI, art, poetry, historic preservation, and literature flourished in Charleston, SC, and the Lowcountry during what has been called the Charleston Renaissance. Angela Mack, Executive Director & Chief Curator of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston...

South Carolina Between World Wars: Politics

January 13, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
James F. Byrnes. During his ten years in the Senate, Byrnes championed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal.

This week on Walter Edgar's Journal , our third program on South Carolina Between the World Wars , features Dr. Vernon Burton of Clemson University, in conversation with Walter Edgar about the politics of the period. During this time, State politics remained a politics very...

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