History

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Charleston Renaissance

January 20, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
"The Reserve in Summer" from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties, ca. 1935, By Alice Ravenel Huger Smith (American, 1876 - 1958); Watercolor on paper;

In the years after WWI, art, poetry, historic preservation, and literature flourished in Charleston, SC, and the Lowcountry during what has been called the Charleston Renaissance. Angela Mack, Executive Director & Chief Curator of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston...

South Carolina Between World Wars: Politics

January 13, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
James F. Byrnes. During his ten years in the Senate, Byrnes championed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal.

This week on Walter Edgar's Journal , our third program on South Carolina Between the World Wars , features Dr. Vernon Burton of Clemson University, in conversation with Walter Edgar about the politics of the period. During this time, State politics remained a politics very...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Impact of the New Deal

January 6, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
A mural entitled "Past and Present Agriculture and Industry of Colleton County" painted by Sheffield Kagy in 1938

When the stock market crashed in 1929, ushering in the Great Depression, South Carolina was already in dire financial straits. Cotton prices had plummeted, even before the boll weevil had decimated the crop. Years of non-sustainable practices in cotton farming had ruined...

"H" is for H.L. Hunley

December 30, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "H" is for H.L. Hunley . On the night of February 17, 1864, the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley attacked and sank the USS Housatonic about four miles off Sullivan’s Island. This was the first successful sinking of an enemy ship by submersible in the...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Great Depression

December 30, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Lewis Hinter with his family on Lady's Island off Beaufort, South Carolina, 1936

Following World War I, South Carolina’s economy collapsed. The post-World-War-I drop in demand for textiles, the subsequent collapse in cotton prices, the exhaustion of farmland through poor farming practices, and the decimation of cotton crops by the boll weevil hit South...

"F" is for Fairfield County

December 26, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "F" is for Fairfield County (687 square miles; 2010 population 23,838). Fairfield County, lying in the lower Piedmont, is a geologically diverse region with topography ranging from level plains to hilly terrain. The county lies primarily between the...

"E" is for Earle, Joseph Haynsworth (1847 - 1897)

December 25, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "E" is for Earle, Joseph Haynsworth (1847 - 1897). U.S. senator. A native of Greenville, Earle was orphaned at five and was reared by an aunt in Sumter. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate army. After the war he attended Furman and was admitted to...

South Carolina State University: A Black Land-Grant College in Jim Crow America

December 23, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
S.C. State University logo

Credit S.C. State Since its founding in 1896, South Carolina State University has provided vocational, undergraduate, and graduate education for generations of African Americans. Now the state’s flagship historically black university, it achieved this recognition after...

The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War in the South

December 9, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter

As the newly appointed commander of the Southern Continental Army in December 1780, Nathanael Greene quickly realized victory would not only require defeating the British Army, but also subduing the region's brutal civil war. "The division among the people is much greater...

Dawson's Fall

November 25, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Roxana Robinson

Roxana Robinson Credit Beowulf Sheehan/Post and Courier Books In Dawson’s Fall (2019, MacMillan), a novel based on the lives of Roxana Robinson’s great-grandparents, the author tells a story of America at its most fragile, fraught, and malleable. Set in 1889, in Charleston...

Andrew Jackson: Symbol for an Age?

November 18, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson returned to the Oval Office, so to speak, in 2017, when President Donald Trump hung the 7th President’s portrait there. Jackson remains one of the most studied and controversial figures in American history. Historian Charles Grier Sellers says, "Andrew...

The Charleston Church Massacre and Journey to Forgiveness

October 21, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
 Charleston, SC, on Sunday morning, July 21, 2015.

On June 17, 2015, twelve members of the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina welcomed a young white man to their evening Bible study. He arrived with a pistol, 88 bullets, and hopes of starting a race war. Dylann Roof’s massacre of nine...

Preserving South Carolina's Endangered Sacred Spaces

October 14, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Balcony seating originally designed for enslaved persons attending services at Trinity Episcopal Church, Abbeville, SC

For almost 30 years, Preservation South Carolina has been dedicated to preserving and protecting the historic and irreplaceable architectural heritage of South Carolina. Executive Director Michael Bedenbaugh and board member join Walter Edgar to talk about some of their...

An Edgefield Planter and His World: The 1840s Journals of Whitfield Brooks

October 7, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Whitfield Brooks's most notorious son: "Preston S. Brooks. Representative in Congress of the U.S. from South Carolina." Circa 1857

In his thoroughly researched and meticulously foot-noted publication, An Edgefield Planter and His World: The 1840s Journals of Whitfield Brooks (2019, Mercer University Press) Dr. James O. Farmer, Jr., opens a window on the life of an elite family and its circle in a now...

The Battle of Kings Mountain and the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution

September 30, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
John Slaughter, Superintendent of US Park Service's Southern Campaign of the American Revolution Parks group.

The Battle of Kings Mountain was a military engagement between Patriot and Loyalist militias during the Southern Campaign of the American Revolutionary War, resulting in a decisive victory for the Patriots. The battle took place on October 7, 1780, in what is now rural...

Pages