Sisterhood: SC Suffragists

Celebrate the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment and learn the role South Carolina women played in the national movement

About Sisterhood: SC Suffragists

Celebrate the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment and learn the role South Carolina women played in the national movement that eventually guaranteed more than 26 million women the right to vote. But there is more to do.

These programs were produced with support from the South Carolina Humanities

Sisterhood: South Carolina Suffragists: Clubwomen, The Pollitzer Sisters & The Vote

As the national debate for suffrage came to the fore, South Carolina women were increasingly drawn into the movement for social and educational reform. Susan Pringle Frost, Eulalie Salley, Marion Birnie Wilkinson and the Pollitzer Sisters - Mabel, Carrie, and Anita, daughters of a prominent Jewish family from Charleston - are among the oft-overlooked and forgotten rebels in the Palmetto State. 

The Rollin Sisters--Reconstruction Through 1895

During Reconstruction, despite their inability to vote or hold political office, the Rollin Sisters, were among the most influential people in South Carolina politics. Born to an aristocratic free Black family in Charleston, this program examines the sisters' efforts and those of their cohorts, whose dreams were once centerstage before being crushed by the fall of Reconstruction.

SC Suffragists: The Grimke Sisters Thru the Civil War

Although best known as fierce abolitionists, Sarah and Angelina Grimke were the first South Carolina Women to publicly advocate for women's suffrage. This program traces the lives of the Grimke sisters and other SC voices in the struggle for women's rights from the late 1830's through the Civil War.

SISTERHOOD: SC SUFFRAGISTS'-MOVING FORWARD

This program highlights the efforts of famous South Carolina suffragists, such as the Grimke sisters, the Rollin sisters, and the Pollitzers. The contemporary discussion, hosted by Beryl Dakers, analyzes the legacy of the passing of the 19th Amendment.

Joining the discussion are Lauren Harper – Affairs Strategist and CEO of Citybright; Keller Barron – Veteran Activist, and former President and Board Member of the League of Women Voters;  Ann Warner – CEO of WREN (Women’s Rights and Empowerment Network); Tamika Isaac Devine – Attorney, and Columbia City Council-Woman and Dr. Lilly Filler: OB/GYN, Chair of the S.C. Holocaust Commission, and President of the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina.