SC News

Exiting FCC Commissioner Talks Net Neutrality, Prison Violence and Her Future

By Thelisha Eaddy

FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn

For the past nine years, South Carolina native Mignon Clyburn has served as commissioner with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). She was sworn into office, on August 3, 2009 at the Matthew J. Perry, Jr. Courthouse in Columbia and since then has become a strong supporter of net neutrality, media ownership reform and lowering prison phone rates.

State House Week for April 27, 2018

By Russ McKinney

State House Week

The State House and Senate remain at odds over reducing SCE&G's nuclear charge, and the state will soon have a new Child Advocate.

Sexual Assault Fought in S.C. with Education, Reporting

By Tut Underwood

This T-shirt was on display during a Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month event

The instance of sexual assault in the United States is growing at a rate that would surprise, even alarm, many people.  According to Shannon Nix, associate director of sexual assault and violence intervention and prevention at the University of South Carolina, one in four women - and one in six men – will be sexually assaulted at some point in their lives.   This high number doesn’t mean more assaults are happening, however.  Nix said it seems that way because more people are reporting it. 

Flood Recovery Still Ongoing for Some Midlands Victims

By Alfred Turner

Four Paws Animal Clinic was almost completely submerged by flood waters following the historic rains of Oct. 4, 2015. The clinic was able recently to reopen back near its original location in Forest Acres near Columbia.

For some, the so-called “thousand-year rain” and the floods that followed it in October 2015 may seem an event long past, but many are still recovering from the storm’s devastation.  For some businesses in Richland County, the after effects of the floods continue to pose particular difficulties. Take the Four Paws Animal Clinic, which was forced to operate out of a temporary location for more than two years after the flood, when the business' original building bordering Gills Creek was ruined.

SC Lede: Palmetto Spotlight - Deadly Prison Fights And Nikki Haley's Bite

By Gavin Jackson

Gavin Jackson (l) speaks with Jamie Lovegrove and Meg Kinnard (r) in the South Carolina Public Radio studios.

Last week saw two South Carolina news stories make local and national headlines.

First, a riot at the Lee Correction Institution maximum-security prison in central South Carolina left seven inmates dead and several others injured. The alleged gang fight was over territory and contraband, and was the deadliest prison riot in 25 years.

Festival-goers Await Repairs to Riverfront Park, Columbia Canal

By Olivia Aldridge

Flooding during October 2015 caused severe damage to both the Columbia Canal and nearby Riverfront Park, destroying the stage and performance area commonly used for River Rocks Festival and other community events. While Riverfront Park has reopened, the p

On a sunny patch of open space along the Congaree River in Columbia, the eighth annual River Rocks Festival brought hundreds of residents out last weekend to enjoy the spring weather and learn about the conservation efforts of the region’s Congaree Riverkeeper and their partners. In between acts, a man took the stage to pump up the crowd. “So, who here is here to listen to some awesome music?” he shouted, to applause.

Earth Day a Reminder to Care for Land, Water, Air

By Alfred Turner

Aerial view of meandering tidal creeks and extensive pristine marshes in North Inlet Estuary.

Earth Day is held each April to remind people of the importance of caring for our world, according to USC Environmental Health Sciences Professor Joe Jones.  He practices what he preaches, as he regularly takes his students outdoors to pick up trash that has washed into a campus creek from Columbia’s Five Points area, where many students eat and drink.  He tells them that if trash could wash from one part of town to another, it could also get into the Congaree River and thus to the coast, and, ultimately, wash up on the shores of other countries.  Geography Professor Kirsten Dow advises peo

College of Charleston Professor Works to Save Coral Reefs

By Alfred Turner

Coral polyps on Molasses Reef, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

People picture coral reefs as bursting with color and teeming with a variety of undersea life, which many are. But their number is shrinking, says College of Charleston biologist Phil Dustan, because they are hyper-sensitive to temperature changes, and climate change is warming the ocean to intolerable levels for many reefs. In his 40-plus years of studying reefs, Dustan said, the Florida Keys, for example, have probably lost 90 to 95 percent of their living coral reefs.

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