History

"L" is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882)

March 28, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882). Clergyman, diplomat. Lynch was born in Ireland. His family immigrated to South Carolina in 1819 and settled in Cheraw. Bishop John England educated Lynch in his boys’ academy in Charleston and then sent...

An Archaeology of Life in Charleston

March 26, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Trowel at an archaeological dig.

(Originally broadcast 12/01/2017) - In Charleston: An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community (2016, University Press of Florida), Martha Zierden, Curator of Historical Archaeology at The Charleston Museum; and, Dr. Betsy Reitz, University of Georgia Athens, weave...

"W" is for Wannamaker, John Edward [1851-1935]

March 16, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "W" is for Wannamaker, John Edward [1851-1935]. Agriculturalist. Civic Leader. Educated at home by private tutors, Wannamaker graduated from Wofford in 1872. After college, he assumed management of his father's farming interests. Keenly interested in...

Work and Economy in South Carolina During World War I

March 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Spinners and doffers in Lancaster Cotton Mills. Lancaster, S.C., circa 1912.

South Carolina in 1918 was still struggling with the changes to its economic and social systems brought about by the Civil War and Reconstruction. The United States’ entry into World War I affected the daily work life of South Carolinians and the state’s economy in a way...

South Carolina Flag Not Official

February 23, 2018 - Posted in Palmetto Scene by Ann Bailey
SC flag

Most South Carolinians find unique points of pride within their state—sweet tea, coastal wildlife, and shag-dancing are staples of its culture. Additionally, many South Carolina residents are particularly proud of a famed symbol: its flag. A white crescent rests in...

"W" is for Wofford College

February 23, 2018 - Posted in Education by Walter Edgar
South Carolina from A to Z logo

“W" is for Wofford College. A four-year liberal arts college in Spartanburg, Wofford was founded with a bequest from the Methodist minister and Spartanburg native Benjamin Wofford. The General Assembly granted a charter in 1851 and the then all-male college opened in 1854...

"S" is for Shaw Air Force Base

February 22, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina from A to Z logo

"S" is for Shaw Air Force Base. Established in 1941 on the outskirts of Sumter to train pilots for World War II, Shaw Air Force Base later evolved into a home for U.S. Air Force tactical units. The facility was named after Sumter native Ervin Shaw, a pilot shot down over...

"P" is for Pines

February 20, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina from A to Z logo

"P" is for Pines. Nine native pine species are found within South Carolina. Three species are restricted to the upper Piedmont and mountain regions, three are found nearly throughout the state, and three are found primarily within the coastal plain. South Carolina pines are...

Black South Carolinians in World War I

February 19, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship badge and campaign hat with cigarette holder

Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war was a way to prove their...

The Military in South Carolina in World War I

February 9, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Camp Jackson

Dr. Andrew Myers from the University of South Carolina Upstate joins Dr. Edgar for a public Conversation on South Carolina History, World War I: S.C. and the Military , on January 23, 2018. It was part of a series presented in January and February, 2018, and sponsored by...

Blue Cheese and Indian Legend Mark Two S.C. Mountain Attractions

February 7, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Tut Underwood
Issaqueena Falls.

The Blue Ridge Mountains of South Carolina are full of stories, both historic and legendary. The history of Clemson Blue Cheese began in Stumphouse Tunnel. The tunnel is near another popular tourist destination in Oconee County, Issaqueena Falls, named after a legendary...

"P" is for Patterson, Gladys Elizabeth Johnston [b. 1939]

February 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "P" is for Patterson, Gladys Elizabeth Johnston [b. 1939]. Legislator. Congresswoman. After graduating from Columbia College, Patterson served as a public affairs officer with the Peace Corps and with VISTA in Washington, D.C. After a brief stint on...

"O" is for Orr, James Lawrence [1822-1873]

February 1, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"O" is for Orr, James Lawrence [1822-1873]. Congressman. Governor. After serving in the General Assembly, Orr was elected to the U.S. Congress as a States-Rights Democrat and served five terms [1849-1859]. By sentiment a Unionist, he believed that the state’s interests...

"N" is for Nielsen, Barbara Stock [b. 1942]

January 31, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"N" is for Nielsen, Barbara Stock [b. 1942]. State Superintendent of Education. A native of Ohio, in 1984, Nielsen became the curriculum specialist and director of business-community partnerships for Beaufort County Schools. In 1990 she was elected state Superintendent of...

"M" is for Marion County

January 30, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"M" is for Marion County [489 square miles; population 35,466]. In 1800 Liberty County was renamed and reorganized as Marion District--named for Revolutionary War hero Francis Marion. Located in northeastern South Carolina, the county is shaped like a knobby sweet potato,...

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