Julia Shillinglaw

S.C. Aiding Global Health Via Telemedicine to Underserved Ugandan Clinic

By Julia Shillinglaw

Residents in Masindi, Uganda.

Most of us who live in the United States have the ability to access some type of medical service. Hopefully, we wouldn’t be faced with the task of walking over 120 miles to receive care. For some people though, that is the only option. In Masindi, Uganda, if you don’t have transportation and have a medical emergency, you may never make it to the clinic in time much less be able to afford the services.

Emergency Mental Health Care Benefits from Telepsychiatry

By Julia Shillinglaw

An EMS and DMH Mobile Crisis Telepsychiatry vehicle.

Seconds count when it comes to a suicidal patient and getting them to the care they need. EMS personnel often find themselves dealing with mental health patients. Because they do not have psychiatry expertise, EMS often has to transport these patients to the ER where they will sit until they can get a correct diagnosis. However, this could take hours and leads to the emergency vehicles being tied up while they may be needed for more urgent needs in their county.

SCTA Work Group Keeping Statewide Telehealth Growth At Its Peak

By Julia Shillinglaw

SCTA IT Work Group

One of the goals for telehealth is to bring care directly to patients in a more convenient way – especially in underserved communities. As rural hospitals close nationwide, the expansion of telehealth services can be a crucial addition to addressing needs in those communities.
 
Since the South Carolina state legislature voted to support the South Carolina Telehealth Alliance (SCTA) with state funding, information technology has been a critical part of their strategic plan in service expansion statewide.
 

SC Impacting Global Health by Bridging Two Worlds To Save Lives

By Julia Shillinglaw

Dr. Godson at Masindi-Kitara Medical Center

Imagine having to walk over 120 miles before you could receive health care. Once you get there, you are told there is no doctor available. This would seem highly improbable for someone living in the United States, but it is quite common in places like Uganda.

Mobile Crisis Fills Gap in Emergency Mental Health Care

By Julia Shillinglaw

EMS Vehicle Prepares to Leave on Call

Every minute counts in an emergency. First responders are trained to arrive at an emergency scene and deliver life-saving treatment as quickly as possible. They’re trained to recognize the difference between a medical emergency and a mental health crisis, because the two scenarios require different modes of treatment.

Mom Uses TeleBurn App To Help Burned Child

By Julia Shillinglaw

Cooper and his mom Sarah use the TeleBurn App.

Cooper, an eight-year-old from Goose Creek, South Carolina was burned severely when he tried to catch a pot falling from the stove. His legs, arms, and stomach suffered third-degree burns. He was quickly rushed to MUSC’s burn clinic, which is currently the only center in the state with a burn clinic for children.

Leaders Focus on School-Based Healthcare Innovation

By Julia Shillinglaw

School-Based Health Collaborative Annual Meeting

It’s cold and flu season again. This means school children are likely sharing more than school supplies; they may also be sharing germs. Close contact in schools makes germ-sharing a year-round occurrence that spikes during cold and flu season. Being sick at school can kick off a progressive cycle of increased absences, which can also mean time off from work for parents to seek care. Taking time off from work is not always easy, especially for parents earning hourly wages.

Charleston Resident Saves Time by Using App to See Doctor

By Julia Shillinglaw

James Wilder takes his dog for a walk outside his home in Charleston, SC.

James Wilder is a social worker in the Charleston area who values his time at work and with his family. When James felt himself coming down with a cold, his wife urged him to see a doctor, but James was reluctant. He didn't want to have to make an appointment, sit in a waiting room with other sick patients (possibly getting exposed to something worse than his own illness), and take time off from his schedule to see a doctor. His wife then found him an alternative: to see a doctor through a telehealth app.

Pages