SC Features

Narrative: Turning Up All the Stones

By Laura Hunsberger

Brooke Howard and Barbara Howard, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Barbara Howard spoke with her daughter, Brooke Howard, about her late husband, James William Howard, who was a "one in a million" father to Brooke and her siblings. Here, Brooke asks her mom to share some memories from the early years in their relationship.

Violinist Brings Sound of Seventeenth-Century Stradivarius to Charleston

By Bradley Fuller

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When the celebrated maker of string instruments Antonio Stradivari put the finishing touches on the violin now known as the Ex-Nachez, Bach and Handel were barely into their toddler years and the invention of the piano was still more than a decade away. 

The rare violin has passed through the hands of many an owner and virtuoso performer since that time, but, as Yuriy Bekker of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra can attest, the instrument is still in excellent playing condition.

Daring, WWII "Doolittle Raid" Began in Columbia

By Tut Underwood

USS HORNET of an Army B-25 on its way to take part in first U.S. air raid on Japan. Doolittle Raid, April 1942.

76 years ago (April 18 1942) 80 brave men did what had never been attempted: they flew army bombers off a U.S. aircraft carrier on their way to bomb Tokyo.  The attack, which has become known to history as the Doolittle Raid, was America’s first strike back at Japan after the infamous sneak attack on Pearl Harbor that brought the United States into World War II.  In this report, Mount Pleasant author James Scott talks about the significance of the raid to the war, and its great psychological effect both on the American and Japanese publics. 

Historic Hangar Gets New Life

By Lynn Cornfoot

Curtiss Wright hangar

When it comes to preserving a building on the National Register of Historic Places, time, money and effort are always part of the challenge.  If restoration is possible, then history can teach, inspire and help to revitalize a local community.

"This Old House" Rehabs Classic Charleston Home

By Alfred Turner

This house on Hassel Street in Charleston got a makeover for the popular PBS program "This Old House."

The popular series "This Old House" has been a fixture on PBS  since 1980.  It has filmed in many locations across the country, and now it has come to South Carolina.  The show recently shot the renovation of a classic single-wide home in Charleston for broadcast beginning this week.  (The series also features the renovation of a second house.)

Cat Cafes Provide Fun, Therapy for Patrons, Homes for Needy Cats

By Tut Underwood

Emily Hughes cuddles with one of the  two-to-three dozen friendly felines to be found at the cat cafe in West Columbia.

Cats are beloved pets by millions, but many people can’t have them because they live where pets aren’t allowed or are subject to other restrictions. However, over the last decade,  a national phenomenon has sprung up to help cat-less cat lovers get their feline fixes: the cat café.  Andres Ortega has opened a cat café in West Columbia, and there are similar cafes in Greenville and Charleston. 

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