Olivia Aldridge

Williams-Brice Stadium Gears Up for Its First Big Concert in Years

By Olivia Aldridge

Beyonce superfan Merrell Johnson in studio.

August 21 will bring the first concert in five years to Columbia’s Williams-Brice Stadium  when Beyoncé and Jay-Z make a stop on their On the Run II Tour. For Columbia local and Beyoncé superfan Merrell Johnson, this is an especially big event. “I’ve been a fan of hers since Day 1, way back when Destiny’s Child first formed. I remember hearing them…it was me and my sister, riding in the back of the car. I was like, ‘Who are these girls?

Recapping the GOP Gubernatorial Runoff Debate

By Olivia Aldridge

Governor Henry McMaster and businessman John Warren (left) debating on June 21 at the Newberry Opera House.

 

 

 

The two remaining Republican gubernatorial candidates faced off Wednesday, June 21 at the Newberry Opera House for a debate co-sponsored by SCETV and the Post and Courier. Governor Henry McMaster and businessman John Warren positioned themselves as the experienced politician and the political outsider throughout the night as the top vote earners from June 12’s primary sparred over healthcare, education and statehouse corruption.

30 Years Later, the Legend of the Lizard Man Lives on in Bishopville

By Olivia Aldridge

Scape Ore Swamp.

The tale goes something like this: a young man gets a flat tire late one night in 1988 while driving near Scape Ore Swamp, and gets out of his car to change it. Then, from the shadows emerges a creature that’s green, wet, seven feet tall, with three fingers, red eyes and scales. As the young man scrambles to drive away, the creature viciously attacks his car. That’s the story 17-year-old Christopher Davis reported to the Lee County Sheriff’s Department in 1988.

Why Does the Turtle Cross the Road?

By Olivia Aldridge

It's common for female turtles to cross roadways during the spring and summer months while searching for nesting grounds.

Now that summer is approaching, it’s a common occurrence to see turtles crawling across roadways in South Carolina (and many other states). Ever wondered why that is? In honor of World Turtle Day, I spoke with Cris Hagen, Director of Animal Management at the Turtle Survival Center, a program of the Turtle Survival Alliance, in Charleston.

Festival-goers Await Repairs to Riverfront Park, Columbia Canal

By Olivia Aldridge

Flooding during October 2015 caused severe damage to both the Columbia Canal and nearby Riverfront Park, destroying the stage and performance area commonly used for River Rocks Festival and other community events. While Riverfront Park has reopened, the p

On a sunny patch of open space along the Congaree River in Columbia, the eighth annual River Rocks Festival brought hundreds of residents out last weekend to enjoy the spring weather and learn about the conservation efforts of the region’s Congaree Riverkeeper and their partners. In between acts, a man took the stage to pump up the crowd. “So, who here is here to listen to some awesome music?” he shouted, to applause.

South Carolina's Weather-Torn State Parks Reopen, "Just in Time for Spring"

By Olivia Aldridge

Park Manager John Wells and Park Interpreter Stacey Jensen at the new Sesquicentennial State Park Boardwalk.

Between the autumns of 2015 and 2017, 47 of South Carolina’s state parks experienced temporary closures due to damages sustained during severe weather events, including the Floods of 2015, Hurricane Matthew, Hurricane Irma and the Pinnacle Mountain Wildfire at Table Rock State Park. February marked an important milestone: for the first time since the fall of 2015, every affected park was reopened.

Two Years After a Historic Flood, Farmers Continue to Recover

By Olivia Aldridge

Adyson Ashley holds one of the birds in her flock.

In September 2015, many farmers in South Carolina were looking forward to a promising harvest. The drought that began in 2014 had subsided in time for at least one crop to flourish remarkably well: by the time October rolled in, full, glistening fields of white cotton spread through rural South Carolina, just shy of ready for harvest. It seemed that farmers would see a rich reward for the stress of the long, dry months that preceded. Then the rain came. From the Midlands to the Lowcountry, record-breaking rainfall accounted for the deaths of 19 South Carolinians during the weekend of Oct.

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