Aimee Crouch

The Charleston Benne Wafer

By Aimee Crouch

benne wafers

People from all around the world have been descending on the South, and South Carolina in general, for their unusual and delectable cuisine. We went down to Charleston to try a product made only in the Lowcountry.

Me, Myself and I

By Aimee Crouch

paint

The arts are important throughout our lives, but especially in the early stages. This summer, the Children’s Fine and Performing Arts Foundation in Charleston hosted a special day, where children with autism learned to express themselves using self-portraits.

Memorial Plans for Mother Emanuel

By Aimee Crouch

Mother Emanuel

Three years ago, the people of Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church, the city of Charleston, and our entire state, mourned the tragic deaths of nine parishioners.  As the church celebrated the 200th anniversary of its joining the A.M.E. church, a plan was unveiled by Michael Arad, the architect who designed the 9/11 Memorial. Arad hopes the eventual memorial will give visitors to this historic sanctuary a designated place to mourn…and to remember.

The next step in the process is raising an estimated $15 million needed to build the memorial before breaking ground.

The Importance of HAM Radio During a Storm

By Aimee Crouch

Antenna

With Hurricane Florence heading to the coast, communications could become an issue between emergency personnel. HAM, or amateur radio, is used when nothing else will work.

S.C. Emergency Management Director, Kim Stenson said, "Amateur radio, ham radio, is extremely important to emergency management, not just here but in every state in the U.S. It’s a form of communication that may work, or will work, when all the other systems are down and it’s proved that in numerous disasters here recently."

USDA Offers Food Safety Tips to Follow During Storm

By Aimee Crouch

Food

As Hurricane Florence heads for South Carolina, the probability of many in the area losing power and flooding is high. One area that this can affect is food safety.  The USDA recommends consumers take the following steps to reduce waste and the risk of foodborne illness before, during and after the storm.

Steps to follow in advance of losing power:

1686 Violin Played in Charleston

By Aimee Crouch

Bekker and Fuller

This past spring, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra performed a concert that was accompanied by a very special, unique, and OLD violin. In fact, this violin is over 300 years old and it one of the world's most celebrated instruments. South Carolina Public Radio’s Bradley Fuller talked with Yuriy Bekker to learn more.

The Organs of L’Organo

By Aimee Crouch

pipe organ

Since 1979, the Piccolo Spoleto Festival held in Charleston has featured a series of pipe organ recitals each day for two weeks beginning on Memorial Day weekend. This year, there are 12 recitals featuring seasoned professionals and gifted young organists from across the U.S.  David Kiser, host of S.C. Public Radio's "On the Keys" and producer of "Pipe Organs of S.C." gives us a sampling of instruments heard in the series that are housed in some of Charleston’s most historic churches.

Sustainability at Sierra Nevada

By Aimee Crouch

Sierra Nevada bottles

Sierra Nevada helped launch the craft beer movement decades ago with the business model of reduce, recycle, and reuse. We visited their second location right over the S.C. border to see how that business model is still being used today.

Virtual School Helps Young Singer

By Aimee Crouch

Shelby Shealy

South Carolina educational options continue to grow with the addition of charter and virtual schools. And some students are beginning to see that traditional brick and mortar schools might not be the best fit for them.

Shelby Shealy, an aspiring country music star, is one of those students.
 

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