Science

SCETV Earth Day Programming includes Sea Change

By Ty Moody

Beach

Earth Day is April 22, 2018.  Upcoming SCETV programs explore how Earth’s climate system is changing. NOVA: Decoding the Weather Machine cuts through the confusion of climate change and SCETV's Sea Change shares the impact of sea level rise on the South Carolina's coast.

Sea Change

Patrick McMillan takes viewers from the sands of Hunting Island State Park to other communities along coastal South Carolina and Georgia, exploring diverse perspectives on the impact of sea level rise on the Eastern Seaboard. 

College of Charleston Professor Works to Save Coral Reefs

By Alfred Turner

Coral polyps on Molasses Reef, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

People picture coral reefs as bursting with color and teeming with a variety of undersea life, which many are. But their number is shrinking, says College of Charleston biologist Phil Dustan, because they are hyper-sensitive to temperature changes, and climate change is warming the ocean to intolerable levels for many reefs. In his 40-plus years of studying reefs, Dustan said, the Florida Keys, for example, have probably lost 90 to 95 percent of their living coral reefs.

"Bill Nye: Science Guy" Documentary Airs on POV (Preview)

By Ty Moody

Bill Nye the Science Guy

Many people today have a love and passion for science thanks to watching "Bill Nye the Science Guy" while they were young. The POV documentary Bill Nye: Science Guy follows the legendary science advocate and TV personality Bill Nye in his pursuit to ignite a passion among Americans, both young and old, for science and science education.

Somewhere, Something Incredible is Waiting to Be Known

Science Project Became Business, Partnership with Walmart for Columbia Family

By Tut Underwood

David Jones inspects a ball half as it comes off the conveyor belt at the Stee-rike 3 plant in Columbia.

David Jones and his son Brantley are baseball fans.  Brantley played as a youngster, and was so enthusiastic about batting practice that his older brother, who didn’t like the game, was forced by circumstance to invent a pitching machine so he wouldn’t have to pitch to his brother for hours every day.  That machine, created as a school science project when he was only 11, and Brantley just 9, became the foundation for a business. 

Skeletons

By Rudy Mancke

NatureNotes

Skeletal material can tell you a lot, if you know what to look fore.

Snook

By Rudy Mancke

Snook

Caught by a listener off of Edisto Beach, a type of fish he'd never seen before...

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