History

South Carolina State University: A Black Land-Grant College in Jim Crow America

April 27, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
S.C. State University logo

Since its founding in 1896, South Carolina State University has provided vocational, undergraduate, and graduate education for generations of African Americans. Now the state’s flagship historically black university, it achieved this recognition after decades of struggling...

“IN PRINCIPLE” to Air Friday Nights on SCETV

April 11, 2018 - Posted in SCETV by Ty Moody
IN PRINCIPLE Co-hosts Michael Gerson and Amy Holmes

IN PRINCIPLE will include guests from the worlds of politics, policy, the arts and academia. The half-hour program features co-hosts Michael Gerson, a frequent contributor to PBS NEWSHOUR, syndicated Washington Post columnist and author of the book Heroic Conservatism; and...

"R" is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860)

April 6, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “R” is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860). Russell’s Magazine was the last of the southern antebellum literary magazines and arguably the best. It was the magazine for the professional middle class—doctors, lawyers, and college faculty. Paul Hamilton...

"P" is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861)

April 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “P” is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861). On November 7th a Union naval squadron including seventeen warships and thirty-five transports (with 1,300 soldiers aboard) entered Port Royal Sound. The warships bombarded Fort Walker on Hilton...

50 Years Later, Congressman Clyburn Reflects on King’s Visits to South Carolina

April 4, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Thelisha Eaddy
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., speaking in Kingstree, SC, May 8, 1966.

On July 30, 1967 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was in South Carolina. He had tea at Septima Clark’s house in Charleston and later that day spoke at a meeting at the old county hall building on King Street. It would be his last visit to the Palmetto state. Nine months later,...

"M' is for Mill Schools

April 3, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Mill Schools. Textile mill executives surrounded their mills with villages and most provided schools to educate the children of mill workers. The mill school was a reflection of the individual community and run with little interference or oversight by the state...

"M" is for Militia

April 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “M” is for Militia. South Carolina’s early settlers brought with them the traditional English concept of a militia, the idea that every citizen had a duty to assist in the defense of the community. A 1671 ordinance required all men (sixteen to sixty)...

"M" is for Military Education

March 30, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Military Education. Since the antebellum period, southerners have regarded military education as an excellent way to instill self-discipline, integrity, patriotism, moral virtue, and a sense of civic duty in youths, particularly young men. The South Carolina...

"L" is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779)

March 29, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779). Signer of the Declaration of Independence. A native of Prince George Winyah Parish, Lynch attended the Indigo Society School. He then travelled to England where he was schooled at Eton and then Caius College...

"L" is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882)

March 28, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882). Clergyman, diplomat. Lynch was born in Ireland. His family immigrated to South Carolina in 1819 and settled in Cheraw. Bishop John England educated Lynch in his boys’ academy in Charleston and then sent...

An Archaeology of Life in Charleston

March 26, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Trowel at an archaeological dig.

(Originally broadcast 12/01/2017) - In Charleston: An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community (2016, University Press of Florida), Martha Zierden, Curator of Historical Archaeology at The Charleston Museum; and, Dr. Betsy Reitz, University of Georgia Athens, weave...

"W" is for Wannamaker, John Edward [1851-1935]

March 16, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "W" is for Wannamaker, John Edward [1851-1935]. Agriculturalist. Civic Leader. Educated at home by private tutors, Wannamaker graduated from Wofford in 1872. After college, he assumed management of his father's farming interests. Keenly interested in...

"U" is for the United Presbyterian Church

March 15, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

U" is for the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. The denomination was formed in 1958 with the union of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America and the United Presbyterian Church in North America. Long-established lowcountry black congregations were...

"T" is for Television

March 14, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "T" is for Television. The first snowy black and white images on South Carolina television screens were broadcast by a Charlotte, North Carolina station. It was not until 1952 that six South Carolina stations received their FCC television broadcast...

"S" is for St. John's Berkeley Parish

March 13, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "S" is for St. John's Berkeley Parish. One of the ten original parishes created in 1706, the parish of St. John's Berkeley stretched northwestward from the upper reaches of the Cooper River to the Santee River through modern Berkeley and Orangeburg...

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