History

"A" is for Adams, James Hopkins [1777-1858]

November 22, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"A" is for Adams, James Hopkins [1777-1858]. Governor. Born in lower Richland County and educated at Yale, Adams was a successful cotton planter. He represented Richland County in both the South Carolina house and senate. In 1854, the General Assembly elected him governor...

"Y" is for Yellow Jessamine

November 21, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "Y" is for Yellow Jessamine. State flower. In 1924, the General Assembly chose the yellow, or Carolina, jessamine [Gelsemium sempervirens] as the state flower. Among the reasons sited were its being indigenous to every nook and corner of the state and...

"W'" is for Walker, William [1809-1875]

November 20, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"W'" is for Walker, William [1809-1875]. Teacher, composer, author. In 1835, the man known as "Singing Billy" Walker published Southern Harmony, a shaped-note hymnal using a four-shape [fa-so-la] system. The shaped-note style is a simplified musical notation developed to...

"E" is for Enoree River

November 17, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"E" is for Enoree River. The Enoree River flows approximately seventy miles from its source in northern Greenville County to its confluence with the Broad River above Columbia. Its basin encompasses more than 730 square miles across South Carolina's Piedmont--the largest...

"D" is for Dixon, Dorsey [1897-1968] and Howard Dixon [1903-1961]

November 16, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"D" is for Dixon, Dorsey [1897-1968] and Howard Dixon [1903-1961]. Musicians. The Dixon Brothers, popular during the 1930s composed many original songs on diverse subjects, including the life and labor of textile workers. With Dorsey on guitar and Howard leading on steel...

"C" is for Cayce

November 15, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"C" is for Cayce [Lexington County; population 12,150]. Cayce encompasses approximately fifteen square miles on the Congaree River. The city is the descendant of the colonial trading village of Granby. In 1817 the Cayce family made the former Fort Granby their private...

"B" is for Bennett, John [1865-1956]

November 14, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"B" is for Bennett, John [1865-1956]. Author. Artist. An Ohio native, Bennett achieved national acclaim for Master Skylark, considered one of the best American historical novels for children. Ill health led to his moving to Charleston. For years he tried unsuccessfully to...

"A" is for Ashmore, Harry Scott [1916-1998]

November 13, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "A" is for Ashmore, Harry Scott [1916-1998]. Author. Editor. Pulitzer Prize Winner. A Clemson graduate, Ashmore went to work for the Greenville Piedmont and Greenville News. His reporting earned him a Nieman Fellowship and a position with the...

"E" is for English, Alexander [b. 1954]

November 10, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

"E" is for English, Alexander [b. 1954]. Basketball player. A graduate of Dreher High School in Columbia, English play college basketball for the University of South Carolina and became the 4th USC player to have his jersey [#22] retired. In the National Basketball...

"D" is for Dixiecrats

November 9, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"D" is for Dixiecrats. Dixiecrats were a political party organized in 1948 by disgruntled white Southern Democrats dismayed over their declining influence within the national Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats, officially known as the States' Rights Democratic Party, were...

"C" is for Cattle ranching

November 8, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "C" is for Cattle ranching. Cow pens, cattle drives, and open-range herding—typically associated with the American West—were important features of the agricultural landscape of colonial South Carolina. British settlers brought husbandry traditions to...

"G" is for Gregg, Maxcy (1814-1862)

November 3, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "G" is for Gregg, Maxcy (1814-1862). Soldier. After graduating as co-valedictorian of his class at South Carolina College, Gregg read law and was admitted to the bar. He was a member of the Southern Rights Convention in 1852. As a Richland County...

"B" is for Barringer Building

November 2, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "B" is for Barringer Building [in Columbia]. Located on Main Street, the Barringer Building was Columbia's first skyscraper; Built in 1903, the skyscraper was initially home to the National Loan and Exchange Bank. However, the property derives its...

"A" is for Allen, Gilbert Bruce [b. 1951]

November 1, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "A" is for Allen, Gilbert Bruce [b. 1951]. Poet, fiction writer, educator. A native New Yorker, Allen moved to South Carolina in 1977—becoming an English professor at Furman. His first collection of poetry, In Everything: poems, 1927-1979 appeared in...

"W" is for Wellford

October 31, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "W" is for Wellford [Spartanburg County; population 2,030] Located in west-central Spartanburg County between the North and Middle Tyger Rivers, Wellford was once part of the hunting grounds of the Cherokee Nation. For most of the 19th century the...

Pages