culture

"R" is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860)

April 6, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “R” is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860). Russell’s Magazine was the last of the southern antebellum literary magazines and arguably the best. It was the magazine for the professional middle class—doctors, lawyers, and college faculty. Paul Hamilton...

"P" is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861)

April 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “P” is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861). On November 7th a Union naval squadron including seventeen warships and thirty-five transports (with 1,300 soldiers aboard) entered Port Royal Sound. The warships bombarded Fort Walker on Hilton...

"P" is for Port Royal

April 4, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "P" is for Port Royal (Beaufort County; population 3,950). In 1869 Stephen Caldwell Miller began construction of the Port Royal Railroad between Augusta, Georgia, and Battery Point on the southern end of Port Royal Island. The town, railroad, and...

"M' is for Mill Schools

April 3, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Mill Schools. Textile mill executives surrounded their mills with villages and most provided schools to educate the children of mill workers. The mill school was a reflection of the individual community and run with little interference or oversight by the state...

"M" is for Militia

April 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “M” is for Militia. South Carolina’s early settlers brought with them the traditional English concept of a militia, the idea that every citizen had a duty to assist in the defense of the community. A 1671 ordinance required all men (sixteen to sixty)...

"M" is for Military Education

March 30, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Military Education. Since the antebellum period, southerners have regarded military education as an excellent way to instill self-discipline, integrity, patriotism, moral virtue, and a sense of civic duty in youths, particularly young men. The South Carolina...

"L" is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779)

March 29, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779). Signer of the Declaration of Independence. A native of Prince George Winyah Parish, Lynch attended the Indigo Society School. He then travelled to England where he was schooled at Eton and then Caius College...

"L" is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882)

March 28, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882). Clergyman, diplomat. Lynch was born in Ireland. His family immigrated to South Carolina in 1819 and settled in Cheraw. Bishop John England educated Lynch in his boys’ academy in Charleston and then sent...

"W" is for Wannamaker, John Edward [1851-1935]

March 16, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "W" is for Wannamaker, John Edward [1851-1935]. Agriculturalist. Civic Leader. Educated at home by private tutors, Wannamaker graduated from Wofford in 1872. After college, he assumed management of his father's farming interests. Keenly interested in...

"U" is for the United Presbyterian Church

March 15, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

U" is for the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. The denomination was formed in 1958 with the union of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America and the United Presbyterian Church in North America. Long-established lowcountry black congregations were...

"T" is for Television

March 14, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "T" is for Television. The first snowy black and white images on South Carolina television screens were broadcast by a Charlotte, North Carolina station. It was not until 1952 that six South Carolina stations received their FCC television broadcast...

"S" is for St. John's Berkeley Parish

March 13, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "S" is for St. John's Berkeley Parish. One of the ten original parishes created in 1706, the parish of St. John's Berkeley stretched northwestward from the upper reaches of the Cooper River to the Santee River through modern Berkeley and Orangeburg...

Work and Economy in South Carolina During World War I

March 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Spinners and doffers in Lancaster Cotton Mills. Lancaster, S.C., circa 1912.

South Carolina in 1918 was still struggling with the changes to its economic and social systems brought about by the Civil War and Reconstruction. The United States’ entry into World War I affected the daily work life of South Carolinians and the state’s economy in a way...

USC's International House Aims to Build Careers, Cultural Understanding

March 1, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Tut Underwood
Students from Oman, the United States and Italy share an Omani dinner at the University of South Carolina's International House.

The halls of the University of South Carolina’s Maxcy College reflect the voices not only of many students, but of many languages. Maxcy houses the University’s International House, a living-learning experience for approximately 200 American and international students. The...

ORIGINAL SC | Ballerina Regina Willoughby

February 28, 2018 - Posted in Original SC by Tabitha Safdi
Regina Willoughby with daughter Melina

“Ballet has taught me that perseverance and grit, not giving up, will take you wherever you want to go. And all of those places you go, those relationships that you make and the impact you have on people and that they have on you…that’s really what this life is all about.”...

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