culture

The Most Influential 20th-Century Southern Novel?

September 19, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Noel Polk, Tudier Harris, and Walter Edgar, taping "Take on the South."

This month, a PBS series, The Great American Read , celebrates the joy of reading and the books we love. Celebrities, authors, and book lovers reveal the novels that have affected their lives. And, the national vote gets under way, to decide America’s Best-Loved Novel. Back...

Liberia, South Carolina: An African American Appalachian Community

September 17, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Soapstone Baptist Church sign, Liberia, S.C.

In 2007, while researching mountain culture in upstate South Carolina, anthropologist John M. Coggeshall stumbled upon the small community of Liberia in the Blue Ridge foothills. There he met Mable Owens Clarke and her family, the remaining members of a small African...

Crossroads: Change in Rural America

September 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
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Crossroads: Change in Rural America is a traveling Smithsonian exhibit that offers small towns a chance to look at their own paths and to highlight the changes that affected their fortunes over the past century. Sponsored by SC Humanities in partnership with local...

Friday the 13th: Object of Fear for Some, Fun for Others

July 13, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
If a black cat crosses your path on Friday the 13th - or any other day - don't worry, says USC sociology professor Barry Markovsky. There is no truth to any superstitions about Friday the 13th, black cats or any other traditional "bad luck" myths.

Of the various superstitions people are subject to, one only manifests itself up to three times a year: Friday the 13th. University of South Carolina sociologist Barry Markovsky says beliefs in things like Friday the 13th - the fear of the day even has a fancy title:...

"M" is for Miller, Thomas Ezekiel (1849-1938)

July 13, 2018 - Posted in Education by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"M" is for Miller, Thomas Ezekiel (1849-1938). Political leader, college president. A native of Beaufort, Miller graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. Returning to South Carolina he opened a law practice in 1875. Miller served in the South Carolina House (1874-...

Craft Beer Industry Growing Rapidly in South Carolina

July 11, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Clay Sears
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Small scale brewing operations like River Rat and Hunter Gatherer in Columbia are representative of the growing craft beer industry in South Carolina and nationwide. For this story we spoke with Kevin Varner, founder of Hunter Gatherer Brewing, about the laws he helped pass...

"L" is for Lyttelton, William Henry (1724-1808)

July 11, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "L" is for Lyttelton, William Henry (1724-1808). Governor. Lyttelton began his career as a colonial administrator when he was appointed governor of South Carolina in 1755. He arrived in Charleston in June 1756. Lyttelton’s tenure was marked by...

Narrative: "I Could See Through My Hands"

July 9, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Laura Hunsberger
Dean Byrd and Willard Byrd, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project that collects the voice of our time. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Dean Byrd talked with his father Willard Byrd, a veteran of the Korean War. Willard had a unique...

"R" is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860)

April 6, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “R” is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860). Russell’s Magazine was the last of the southern antebellum literary magazines and arguably the best. It was the magazine for the professional middle class—doctors, lawyers, and college faculty. Paul Hamilton...

"P" is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861)

April 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “P” is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861). On November 7th a Union naval squadron including seventeen warships and thirty-five transports (with 1,300 soldiers aboard) entered Port Royal Sound. The warships bombarded Fort Walker on Hilton...

"P" is for Port Royal

April 4, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "P" is for Port Royal (Beaufort County; population 3,950). In 1869 Stephen Caldwell Miller began construction of the Port Royal Railroad between Augusta, Georgia, and Battery Point on the southern end of Port Royal Island. The town, railroad, and...

"M' is for Mill Schools

April 3, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Mill Schools. Textile mill executives surrounded their mills with villages and most provided schools to educate the children of mill workers. The mill school was a reflection of the individual community and run with little interference or oversight by the state...

"M" is for Militia

April 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “M” is for Militia. South Carolina’s early settlers brought with them the traditional English concept of a militia, the idea that every citizen had a duty to assist in the defense of the community. A 1671 ordinance required all men (sixteen to sixty)...

"M" is for Military Education

March 30, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Military Education. Since the antebellum period, southerners have regarded military education as an excellent way to instill self-discipline, integrity, patriotism, moral virtue, and a sense of civic duty in youths, particularly young men. The South Carolina...

"L" is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779)

March 29, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779). Signer of the Declaration of Independence. A native of Prince George Winyah Parish, Lynch attended the Indigo Society School. He then travelled to England where he was schooled at Eton and then Caius College...

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