culture

Conversations on S.C. History: Women and World War I

July 3, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
Detail from a poster showing a Red Cross nurse with an American flag and the Red Cross symbol.

Prior to that World War I, South Carolina was a predominantly rural state, with a Black majority populaltion. The typical S.C. woman in 1916 was Black, and, if she was employed, she was likely an agricultural worker or a domestic worker. If she was White, a working woman...

Reconstruction and the African American Struggle for Equality in the South

June 22, 2020 - Posted in Culture by Alfred Turner
The first black U.S. senator and first black House members were elected by Southern states during Reconstruction.

Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., has said, "Reconstruction is one of the most important and consequential chapters in American history. It is also among the most overlooked, misunderstood and misrepresented." For an overview of this fraught era in American history, Dr. Walter...

What Does Freedom Mean? The Agency of Black People Before and After Emancipation

June 17, 2020 - Posted in History by Walter Edgar
Juneteenth Celebration, Texas 1905

On June 19th, 1865, Union general Gordon Granger read federal orders in Galveston, Texas, that all previously enslaved people in Texas were free. The news of Emancipation had finally come to the state. Today, this day is celebrated as Juneteenth. What did it mean to these...

Reclaiming a Lost Hero of World War II

May 18, 2020 - Posted in History by Alfred Turner
Tarawa, Kiribati - U.S. Marines storm Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. The battle (November 20-23, 1943) was one of the bloodiest of WWII.

In November 1943, Marine 1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman, Jr. was mortally wounded while leading a successful assault on a critical Japanese fortification on the Pacific atoll of Tarawa, and posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor. The brutal...

Horse Racing and Horse Culture in South Carolina and Beyond

March 2, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Currier & Ives & Cameron, J. (ca. 1884) An exciting finish

According to the South Carolina Encyclopedia, “’The Sport of Kings’ emerged in South Carolina as soon as colonists gained firm footing and began amassing property and wealth enough to emulate the lifestyles of England and the Caribbean.” Horse racing and horse culture...

The Charleston Church Massacre and the Journey to Forgiveness

February 28, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
The scene outside Emanuel A.M.E. Church, Charleston, SC, on Sunday morning, July 21, 2015.

On June 17, 2015, twelve members of the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina welcomed a young white man to their evening Bible study. He arrived with a pistol, 88 bullets, and hopes of starting a race war. Dylann Roof’s massacre of nine...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Beginnings of Black Activism

January 27, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.

Black South Carolinians, despite poverty and discrimination, began to organize and lay the basis for the civil rights movement that would occur after World War II. Dr. Bobby Donaldson of the University of South Carolina talks about the efforts by black South Carolinians to...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Charleston Renaissance

January 20, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
"The Reserve in Summer" from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties, ca. 1935, By Alice Ravenel Huger Smith (American, 1876 - 1958); Watercolor on paper;

In the years after WWI, art, poetry, historic preservation, and literature flourished in Charleston, SC, and the Lowcountry during what has been called the Charleston Renaissance. Angela Mack, Executive Director & Chief Curator of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston...

South Carolina Between World Wars: Politics

January 13, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
James F. Byrnes. During his ten years in the Senate, Byrnes championed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal.

This week on Walter Edgar's Journal , our third program on South Carolina Between the World Wars , features Dr. Vernon Burton of Clemson University, in conversation with Walter Edgar about the politics of the period. During this time, State politics remained a politics very...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Impact of the New Deal

January 6, 2020 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
A mural entitled "Past and Present Agriculture and Industry of Colleton County" painted by Sheffield Kagy in 1938

When the stock market crashed in 1929, ushering in the Great Depression, South Carolina was already in dire financial straits. Cotton prices had plummeted, even before the boll weevil had decimated the crop. Years of non-sustainable practices in cotton farming had ruined...

"H" is for H.L. Hunley

December 30, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "H" is for H.L. Hunley . On the night of February 17, 1864, the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley attacked and sank the USS Housatonic about four miles off Sullivan’s Island. This was the first successful sinking of an enemy ship by submersible in the...

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Great Depression

December 30, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Lewis Hinter with his family on Lady's Island off Beaufort, South Carolina, 1936

Following World War I, South Carolina’s economy collapsed. The post-World-War-I drop in demand for textiles, the subsequent collapse in cotton prices, the exhaustion of farmland through poor farming practices, and the decimation of cotton crops by the boll weevil hit South...

South Carolina State University: A Black Land-Grant College in Jim Crow America

December 23, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
S.C. State University logo

Credit S.C. State Since its founding in 1896, South Carolina State University has provided vocational, undergraduate, and graduate education for generations of African Americans. Now the state’s flagship historically black university, it achieved this recognition after...

The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War in the South

December 9, 2019 - Posted in History by Alfred Turner
Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter

As the newly appointed commander of the Southern Continental Army in December 1780, Nathanael Greene quickly realized victory would not only require defeating the British Army, but also subduing the region's brutal civil war. "The division among the people is much greater...

Dawson's Fall

November 25, 2019 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Roxana Robinson

Roxana Robinson Credit Beowulf Sheehan/Post and Courier Books In Dawson’s Fall (2019, MacMillan), a novel based on the lives of Roxana Robinson’s great-grandparents, the author tells a story of America at its most fragile, fraught, and malleable. Set in 1889, in Charleston...

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