culture

Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection

November 8, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Detail from Art Studio, by Thereas Pollak.

Spanning the decades between the late 1890s and early 1960s, The Johnson Collection’s new exhibition and its companion book, Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection, examine the particularly complex challenges Southern women artists...

Violinist Benjamin Beilman Brings Brahms on Return Visit to South Carolina

November 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Bradley Fuller
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For violinist Benjamin Beilman, the music of Johannes Brahms has timeless appeal. Striking what he considers a “perfect balance” between the personal and the objective, works like the German Romantic composer’s Violin Concerto in D major, op. 77, still have the power to...

Uncompromising Activist: Richard Greener, First Black Professor at USC

October 29, 2018 - Posted in Education by Alfred Turner
Richard T. Greener, circa 1900; by J. H. Cunningham. In The Colored American, February 24, 1900.

Richard T. Greener, circa 1900; by J. H. Cunningham. In The Colored American, February 24, 1900. Credit The Colored American, February 24, 1900 / Library of Congress/Chronicling America (Originally broadcast 06/01/18) - Richard Theodore Greener (1844–1922) was a renowned...

My Tour Through the Asylum: a Southern Integrationist's Memoir

October 15, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Dr. William Dufford

(Originally broadcast 04/06/18) - Immortalized in the writings of his most famous student, best-selling author Pat Conroy, veteran education administrator William E. Dufford has led an the life of a stalwart champion for social justice and equal access for all to the...

Grammy-Winning Guitarist Jason Vieaux Talks Chamber Music

October 9, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Bradley Fuller
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The expressive capabilities of a lone guitar are not lost on Jason Vieaux. In 2015, the guitarist’s recordings for the album Play (Azica Records) won him that year’s Grammy Award for Best Classical Instrumental Solo. But for this versatile artist, it’s not all about solo...

Pat Conroy: My Exaggerated Life

October 1, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Pat Conroy and Katherine Clark

Pat Conroy’s memoirs and autobiographical novels contain a great deal about his life, but there is much he hasn’t revealed with readers until now. My Exaggerated Life (2018, University of South Carolina Press) is the product of a special collaboration between this great...

Saying Goodbye to Two Iconic Radio Series

September 26, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Ray Magliozzi, the late Tom Magliozzi, and the late Marian McPartland.

This month two of the longest running, most iconic public radio series end their runs on South Carolina Public Radio: Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz and Car Talk . Piano Jazz Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz began airing in 1979 and was NPR's longest-lived cultural program;...

The Most Influential 20th-Century Southern Novel?

September 19, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
Noel Polk, Tudier Harris, and Walter Edgar, taping "Take on the South."

This month, a PBS series, The Great American Read , celebrates the joy of reading and the books we love. Celebrities, authors, and book lovers reveal the novels that have affected their lives. And, the national vote gets under way, to decide America’s Best-Loved Novel. Back...

Liberia, South Carolina: An African American Appalachian Community

September 17, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Soapstone Baptist Church sign, Liberia, S.C.

In 2007, while researching mountain culture in upstate South Carolina, anthropologist John M. Coggeshall stumbled upon the small community of Liberia in the Blue Ridge foothills. There he met Mable Owens Clarke and her family, the remaining members of a small African...

Crossroads: Change in Rural America

September 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
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Crossroads: Change in Rural America is a traveling Smithsonian exhibit that offers small towns a chance to look at their own paths and to highlight the changes that affected their fortunes over the past century. Sponsored by SC Humanities in partnership with local...

Friday the 13th: Object of Fear for Some, Fun for Others

July 13, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
If a black cat crosses your path on Friday the 13th - or any other day - don't worry, says USC sociology professor Barry Markovsky. There is no truth to any superstitions about Friday the 13th, black cats or any other traditional "bad luck" myths.

Of the various superstitions people are subject to, one only manifests itself up to three times a year: Friday the 13th. University of South Carolina sociologist Barry Markovsky says beliefs in things like Friday the 13th - the fear of the day even has a fancy title:...

"M" is for Miller, Thomas Ezekiel (1849-1938)

July 13, 2018 - Posted in Education by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"M" is for Miller, Thomas Ezekiel (1849-1938). Political leader, college president. A native of Beaufort, Miller graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. Returning to South Carolina he opened a law practice in 1875. Miller served in the South Carolina House (1874-...

Craft Beer Industry Growing Rapidly in South Carolina

July 11, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Clay Sears
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Small scale brewing operations like River Rat and Hunter Gatherer in Columbia are representative of the growing craft beer industry in South Carolina and nationwide. For this story we spoke with Kevin Varner, founder of Hunter Gatherer Brewing, about the laws he helped pass...

"L" is for Lyttelton, William Henry (1724-1808)

July 11, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "L" is for Lyttelton, William Henry (1724-1808). Governor. Lyttelton began his career as a colonial administrator when he was appointed governor of South Carolina in 1755. He arrived in Charleston in June 1756. Lyttelton’s tenure was marked by...

Narrative: "I Could See Through My Hands"

July 9, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Laura Hunsberger
Dean Byrd and Willard Byrd, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project that collects the voice of our time. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Dean Byrd talked with his father Willard Byrd, a veteran of the Korean War. Willard had a unique...

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