Culture

South Carolina Slave Home to Become Centerpiece for Smithsonian’s New Museum

By Tabitha Safdi

Slave HomeDown a dirt road on Edisto Island, in the middle of Point of Pines Plantation, stood a dilapidated home chock-full of history. The home was one of two of the nation’s oldest slave cabins, dating to the 1850s. According to the NY Times , “Black families lived in the wood-sided, two-room houses, without electricity or heating, until the 1980s." The NY Times : “For years, local historians had struggled to save the pinewood building. After the last residents moved out, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places, in 1986. Three years ago, the plantation’s owners donated the cabin but...

Annie Leibovitz Talks About Touring with The Rolling Stones

By Aimee Crouch

LeibovitzFamed celebrity photographer Annie Leibovitz has captured portraits of many famous people throughout her career. On the latest episode of Palmetto Scene, she sits down with us to talk about her life, her career, and her exhibit, Pilgrimage, that is now showing at The Columbia Museum of Art through January. In this clip, Leibovitz reminisces about her time touring with The Rolling Stones.

The Iconic Upstate Restaurant Still Serving Smiles “A-plenty”

By William Richardson

BeaconBeacon Drive-In opened in 1946 and is now a Spartanburg landmark. John B. White founded The Beacon. The Beacon's large menu features an entire selection of "a-plenty" dishes such as beef a-plenty and chili-cheese burger a-plenty. The "a-plenty" dishes are served with french fries and onion rings. Kenny Church says, “We try to give people plenty. He [White] actually started the Beacon after the Depression when people didn’t have much food. So he started a plate called 'a-plenty' which is a lot of food." J.C. Stroble, a man famous for calling out orders, passed away in August 2013. Stroble had...

Nationally Renowned Chef Matt Lee Makes Loquat Liqueur

By Aimee Crouch

Lee BrosCharleston's amazing history and outstanding food is a haven for visitors. Two brothers who grew up in Charleston are now offering a “taste” of the coastal town in a new cookbook, The Lee Brothers Charleston Kitchen . According to NPR, "In addition to highlighting Charleston's current food culture, Matt and Ted Lee also looked to Charleston's history to find old recipes that might have been forgotten. Cookbooks from the 19th century were particularly inspiring, Ted says. "They tell a story so diverse and varied about the different types of vegetables that were grown in the Lowcountry, some of...

Coach John McKissick: The Winningest Coach in the Nation

By Tabitha Safdi

McKissickCoach John McKissick has done something football coaches across the country can only dream about achieving. In 2012, he became the first American football coach in history to win 600 career games. Coach McKissick currently holds the record for the most wins by a football coach on any level. ESPN calls the Summerville High School football coach the “Coach of the Century.” When ESPN The Magazine asked Coach McKissick about retiring, his response was epic. “My wife, Joan, says it and I say it too: I would retire, but it would look bad after 61 years of marriage to get a divorce." For more on...

An Interview with Lunch Money, the S.C. Indie Rock Band

By Tabitha Safdi

Lunch MoneyThe band Lunch Money is making waves with audiences everywhere with songs about dollhouses, balloons and pushing buttons. These audiences aren’t just pint-sized people either. Parents are finding this indie music fun, too. “I love it when adults tell us, 'I find myself listening to your album even when my kids aren't around.' That’s the point,” says bass player, J.D. Stephens. The Columbia, South Carolina-based band has songs in regular rotation on SiriusXM Radio, and the band has played venues and festivals around the United States. NPR had this to say about Lunch Money: “One characteristic...

The Spartanburg Talladega Connection

By William Richardson

Nascar racingThe Talladega racetrack in Alabama was originally slated to be built in Spartanburg, SC. Spartanburg natives David Pearson, Cotton Owens and Bud Moore are among those that give thoughts on what might have been.

History of Spartanburg

By William Richardson

Morgan Square in Spartanburg, SCSpartanburg, South Carolina is well known for its textile manufacturing and for being a railroad hub. Dr. Philip Racine, Professor of History at Wofford College delves a little deeper into its background and history.

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