William Richardson

​Stumphouse Tunnel

By William Richardson

Stumphouse Tunnel

​Stumphouse Tunnel was built in the 1850s in Walhalla, S.C. The tunnel was built to connect the railway between Charleston and Knoxville. The men who built the tunnel worked twelve hours a day, seven days a week, using only shovels, pick axes and dynamite. Eventually, Stumphouse Tunnel was closed due to lack of money, and then the Civil War started. Because so many men worked for so long on a tunnel that went nowhere, and so many of them lost their lives and were maimed and hurt in the tunnel late at night, the workers continue to be heard, but the work will never be finished.

Old Exhange Ghost

By William Richardson

cemetary

Old Exchange Building and Provost Dungeon, Charleston, S.C.

Isaac Hayne was imprisoned there in 1781. He was a very popular businessman, well-off, whom they led through the streets of Charleston, by his sister's home, in shackles and chains on his way to the gallows. She asked that he please come back! He responded, "I will, if I can." It is thought that he visits her there, keeping the promise he made to her that day on the way to his execution.

One more story is yet to come...

Aiken Ghosts

By William Richardson

Aiken Ghosts

Find stories from the Old Post Office, Annie's Inn, and the cemetery at St. Thaddeus in Aiken, S.C.

Pirate Captain's Buried Treasure

By William Richardson

Pirate Tour Guide

Folklore claims a pirate captain buried treasure at 37 Meeting Street in Charleston. There are three versions of the story. The captain later found one of his supposedly trusted crewmen attempting to dig up his treasure.  It is believed that the crewman remains to this day, still protecting this buried treasure.

The Ghosts of Newberry

By William Richardson

The Ghosts of Newberry

Ghost of Madeline, Newberry, S.C.

The legend of Madeline, the young woman who climbed the bell tower of Keller Hall at Newberry College, and while searching for her fiance', John, she slipped and fell to the ground with the bell tower rope wrapped around her neck, and was strangled. A local doctor said she died of a broken heart. Students at the college have told stories of seeing Madeline in a sheer, white dress.

Bride of West End, Newberry, S.C.

Ghost of Zoe at Poogan's Porch

By William Richardson

Ghost of Zoe at Poogan's Porch

Poogan's Porch has been located on Queen Street in Charleston, S.C. since 1976. Zoe St. Amand and her sister, Elizabeth, were spinsters who lived together for more than 60 years, the last 20 of which were lived there on Queen Street. When Elizabeth died after a short illness, Zoe couldn't deal with it very well. She moved into a nursing home and died there in 1954, nine years after her sister's death. The new owners turned the house into a restaurant and many renovations were needed, which angered Zoe greatly.

Active Violence Training

By William Richardson

A sign on a rescue workers vest

No matter what your profession, training is essential, and we all never stop learning. This is especially true in modern times when it comes down to how Police, Fire and Emergency Medical Services personnel are trained to react to situations that happen all too frequently today. Spartanburg County Law Enforcement, Fire Departments and Emergency Medical Teams are taking the lead in providing the training needed to respond to today’s ever changing acts of violence.

 

FEMA Staging at Spartanburg Downtown Airport

By William Richardson

A line of ambulances

Prior to Hurricane Florence making landfall on the Carolina coasts, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (F.E.M.A.) determined that Spartanburg, South Carolina was in an ideal location to pre-stage its assets to move in for post storm emergencies. The Spartanburg Downtown Airport hosted the group.
 

 

The Gray Man and Hurricanes

By William Richardson

The Gray Man

Plowden C.J. Weston went to England to be educated but returned to his beloved Pawleys Island, where he and his lovely English wife, Emily Esdaille Weston, built the Pelican Inn. He lived until almost the end of the Civil War, but died of tuberculosis in 1864. After his death, people began to see the Gray Man before every major hurricane.

Could the figure in the gray greatcoat be that of Plowden C.J. Weston, who loved Pawleys Island more than anyone else?
 

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