Tut Underwood

Civil Rights Movement Had its Roots in World War I

By Tut Underwood

Men of the 369th (15th N.Y.) who won the Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action, sailing home on The Stockholm in 1919.

As soldiers were fighting overseas during World War I, there was another battle going on back home:  the battle for a better life for African Americans.  Historian Janet Hudson, speaking at a recent symposium on the war presented by Lander University in Greenwood, said even as they chafed under segregation and Jim Crow laws designed to keep them back socially and policially, black leaders saw the war as an opportunity to earn their rights by cooperating with white leaders and supporting the war through volunteering to fight, raising money and other means.

Symposium Examines Women's Roles During World War I

By Tut Underwood

From The Electrical Experimenter, October, 1916.

Lander University recented hosted a symposium on World War I, which ended just over a century ago.  The symposium drew scholars and authors primarily from the Southeast to discuss various aspects of the war, which then was known as "The Great War."  One aspect covered by a panel of experts examined the role of women during the war.

New Music Series Kicks Off with Birthday Salute to Marian McPartland

By Tut Underwood

Diana Krall was one of the many guests Marian McPartland welcomed to Piano Jazz over its long run.

For many years, jazz great Marian McPartland welcomed some of the biggest names in - and out of - jazz to her NPR program, Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz.  March 20, on the 101st anniversary of her  birth, an evening of McPartland's music inaugurated a new music series, Live in the Lobby, offered by Columbia's Koger Center for the Arts.  

South Carolinians Are Beginning to Get Real - IDs, That Is

By Tut Underwood

The Real I.D. is dentified by the gold star in the upper right corner.

Many people enjoy traveling by air.  But after Oct. 1, 2020, they won't be able to board a commercial airplane in the United States, UNLESS they have the new "Real ID."  The new ID will replace current drivers' licenses and ID cards, and will be needed for people to gain entry to certain secured federal buildings and all military posts, as well as to board planes. Lauren Phillips of the South Carolina Dept.

Cyber Insurance Now a Must-Have for South Carolina Businesses

By Tut Underwood

File

As hackers become more sophisticated at burrowing into business computers to steal everything from money to social security numbers and medical records, the need for protection grows ever more dire.  One way to help mitigate the damage, if not protect information from being stolen, was virtually unknown a decade ago.  But in the past five years or so, cyber insurance has become a must-have bulwark against hackers.

Greenville Man Worked with NASA as "First Artist of Space"

By Tut Underwood

In the 1960s, Renato Moncini attended every rocket launch at Cape Canaveral/Kennedy on his own time.

 

 

In the 1960s, Renato Moncini attended every rocket launch at Cape Canaveral/Kennedy on his own time. Here he readies his materials to paint one of the launches.

Credit Courtesy of the artist.

 

Greenville artist Renato Moncini is a native of Italy, but between his journey from his homeland and his long residence in the South Carolina Upstate, he served more than a decade as what some call the "first artist of space."

South Carolina to See a "Super-Wolf-Blood Moon"

By Tut Underwood

Stages of a total lunar eclipse,  July 27, 2018. The first image was taken not long after moonrise, image at the center at about the maximum, last image on the right at the end of the eclipse.

Sunday, Jan. 20, South Carolinians will get a rare treat from the sky, as three events come together to form what some are calling a Super-Wolf-Blood moon.  A wolf moon is simply a traditional name for the full moon in January, and happens, obviously, every year.  However, this year it's occurring at the same time as a super moon, which S.C.

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