Tut Underwood

Ham Operators Ready to Provide Emergency Communications in the Event of Crises

By Tut Underwood

Ham radio operator Warren Rickey calls amateur operators statewide in SC HEART's weekly training exercise.  The group was founded to provide emergency communications when a disaster destroys phone and Internet capabilities.

When a disaster strikes, communications may become spotty or even gone completely.  Cell phone towers may be down, land lines even disrupted, and if the Internet is offline, there goes email.  Keeping communications open for hospitals and other health care facilities during these types of crises are what amateur radio operators - or "hams" - train for once a week, as members of the South Carolina Healthcare Emergency Amateur

75th Anniversary of D-Day Brings Veterans' Recollections of Tyranny's End in Europe

By Tut Underwood

The Allies suffered nearly 10,000 casualties on D Day, including 2500 dead.  Here they rest at Normandy.

75 years ago - June 6, 1944 - 156,000 Allied troops on nearly 7000 ships and landing craft and supported by 11,590 planes dropping both bombs and paratroopers, landed on the beaches of Normandy, France.  The top-secret invasion of Europe was code-named Operation Overlord, but is more broadly known the world over as D-Day.  That day began the battle to free the continent from the grip of Nazi Germany.  

Citizens' Academy Teaches Public How State, Local Governments Respond to Emergencies

By Tut Underwood

Historic 2015 flood

The past few years of historic floods and hurricanes has amply demonstrated how subject South Carolina can be to severe weather emergencies.  To help the public better understand how the state reacts to and deals with these situations, the S.C. Emergency Management Division has created a new program, the Citizens' Academy.

Re-release of "Uncle Walt's Band" Celebrates Influential South Carolina Vocal Trio

By Tut Underwood

3ba230fd-0ac4-4e65-8f3b-f712d273bb6d

In the 1970s and early '80s, an acoustic trio from Spartanburg made its mark with well-crafted tunes featuring beautiful harmonies.  Walter Hyatt, Champ Hood and David Ball were known as Uncle Walt's Band.  Their blend of folk, swing, and bluegrass influences attracted audiences wherever they lived - including Spartanburg, Nashville and, ultimately, Austin, Texas.  But, strangely, the enthusiasm of their fans never went beyond a faithful cult following.

Civil Rights Movement Had its Roots in World War I

By Tut Underwood

Men of the 369th (15th N.Y.) who won the Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action, sailing home on The Stockholm in 1919.

As soldiers were fighting overseas during World War I, there was another battle going on back home:  the battle for a better life for African Americans.  Historian Janet Hudson, speaking at a recent symposium on the war presented by Lander University in Greenwood, said even as they chafed under segregation and Jim Crow laws designed to keep them back socially and policially, black leaders saw the war as an opportunity to earn their rights by cooperating with white leaders and supporting the war through volunteering to fight, raising money and other means.

Symposium Examines Women's Roles During World War I

By Tut Underwood

From The Electrical Experimenter, October, 1916.

Lander University recented hosted a symposium on World War I, which ended just over a century ago.  The symposium drew scholars and authors primarily from the Southeast to discuss various aspects of the war, which then was known as "The Great War."  One aspect covered by a panel of experts examined the role of women during the war.

New Music Series Kicks Off with Birthday Salute to Marian McPartland

By Tut Underwood

Diana Krall was one of the many guests Marian McPartland welcomed to Piano Jazz over its long run.

For many years, jazz great Marian McPartland welcomed some of the biggest names in - and out of - jazz to her NPR program, Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz.  March 20, on the 101st anniversary of her  birth, an evening of McPartland's music inaugurated a new music series, Live in the Lobby, offered by Columbia's Koger Center for the Arts.  

Pages