Thelisha Eaddy

Women Won the Right to Vote a Century Ago; This Organization Works to Protect That Right

By Thelisha Eaddy

National League of Women VotersIn February of 1920, just six months before the 19th amendment was ratified, the League of Women Voters was founded by Suffragists of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in Chicago, Illinios. The nonpartisan organization has been referred to as a "mighty political experiment," designed to help 20 million women carry out their new responsibilities as voters. Dr. Laura Wolliver, President of the League of Women Voters of the Columbia South Carolina area, said league founders like Carrie Chapman Catt wanted their work to transition from fighting for the vote to protecting access to...

Army Identifies Soldier Found Dead at Fort Jackson

By Thelisha Eaddy

Fort JacksonSunday, Army officials identified the basic combat training soldier who was found dead in his barracks at Fort Jackson on September 12. 29-year old Pvt. Michael Wise from Wisconsin was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment. Saturday, officials announced a 48-hour training stand down. "This is a difficult time for everyone who knew Michael and we continue to provide comfort to his teammates," said Fort Jackson Commander Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. "Chaplains and other medical professionals are helping those in need." The exact cause of death is under investigation...

State GOP Leaders: It's All About the Issues

By Thelisha Eaddy

DNC delegatesDay one of the Republican National Convention was full of the expected, the party officially nominating Donald Trump and Mike Pence as President and Vice President for its presidential ticket, and the unexpected, surprise visits from both Pence and Trump. State party Chairman Drew McKissick said, despite the significantly-scaled back production, members are still extremely engaged and excited. “They are excited because of the things the President has done and the things that he will be able to do in another four years.” Those things, he said, include building the most successful economy in...

An Unexpected Advantage of a Virtual Convention

By Thelisha Eaddy

Buttons are a big deal at national conventions. Despite not being able to attend the convention in person, Bruce said delegates still got their national and state swag bags, complete with 2020 convention buttons.In 1988, Catherine Bruce’s father attended the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, Georgia; she still has his program booklet. This Year, Bruce is following in her dad’s footsteps as she attends the DNC’s virtual convention that was supposed to take place in Milwaukie, Wisconsin. Bruce, a delegate for former Vice President Joe Biden, has attended the party’s national conventions before; first in 2012 in Charlotte North Carolina and again in 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. But this year, as a delegate, things were supposed to be different. “Only the delegates get to do certain...

‘It’s Time to Change the Trajectory.’ SC Senator to Speak Tuesday During Virtual DNC

By Thelisha Eaddy

Sen. Kimpson pictured in Feb. 2020 shaking hands with Joe BidenThe second night of the National Democratic Convention will feature South Carolina Senator Marlon Kimpson as one of 17 “rising stars” within the party. They will deliver a joint speech on why leadership matters. Kimpson, who represents Charleston and Dorchester counties, was an early supporter of Joe Biden. His endorsement of the former vice president came almost two months before the state’s Democratic Presidential Primary, this past February. “I thought he was the best positioned Democrat to lead this country in a totally different direction.” Kimpson said now is the time for the leadership...

When an Unlikely Ally of Women's Suffrage Emerged In Edgefield, Support for the Cause Grew

By Thelisha Eaddy

Emily Anderson DunovantEmily Anderson Dunovantfield lived in Edgefield, South Carolina. She was well-educated and what many called a traditional woman. But during the early 1900's, Dunovant used a radical voice to help elevate the women's suffrage cause in South Carolina. Dr. James O. Farmer, Jr. is author and emeritas professor of History at the University of South Carolina- Aiken. From his biographical sketch of Dunovant, written for Biographical Database of NAWSA Suffragists, 1890-1920 , we learn Dunovant was born in December of 1866 in Spartanburg County. Her father was a Confederate veteran and a "red shirt"...

'Inspired To Use Her Voice For Women's Rights,' Eulalie Salley Followed Her Mind, Broke Barriers

By Thelisha Eaddy

Pickens-Salley HouseEulalie was born in Georgia on December 11, 1883. She grew up on a plantation near Augusta, was privately educated and attended both, Virginia's Mary Baldwin College and Converse College in Spartanburg, SC. In 1906, she married attorney Julian Salley (later mayor of Aiken) and together they had two children. But it was the court case of another woman's fight to regain custody of her own children that prompted Salley to join the fight for suffrage. In this episode of Sisterhood: SC Suffragists, we learn Eulalie Chafee Salley joined the South Carolina Equal Suffrage League, by sending a dollar...

The Fall of Reconstruction, Rise of Jim Crow Created Missed Opportunities for Women's Suffrage

By Thelisha Eaddy

US Postal Service 19th Amendment: Women Vote stamp. Inspired by historic photographs, the stamp features a stylized illustration of suffragists marching in a parade or other public demonstration.The women’s suffrage movement was a decades-long fight that most historians place starting with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention . But there are some who place the nearly 100-year struggle starting, in earnest, decades before the civil war with the proliferation of reform groups like temperance leagues, religious movements and antislavery organizations. But regardless of when the movement actually begins, periods of time between Reconstruction, Jim Crow and the Civil Rights Movement offer moments of missed opportunities for the movement and the nation. In this episode of Sisterhood: South...

At This Intersection in Downtown Columbia, The Rollin Sisters Fought For the Vote

By Thelisha Eaddy

Views from Sumter and Senate streets in Downtown ColumbiaTo celebrate the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, South Carolina Public Radio and South Carolina ETV are broadcasting the series Sisterhood: South Carolina Suffragists. The series looks at how local women played roles in a national movement that eventually guaranteed more than 26 million women the right to vote. The East side of the Statehouse House grounds, an historic church and the South Carolina Human Affairs Commission sit at the corner of Sumter and Senate streets in downtown Columbia. These sites and buildings can represent a...

Sisterhood: SC Suffragists, A Look at How Local Women Helped Secure the Right to Vote

By Thelisha Eaddy

Suffragists demonstrating against Woodrow Wilson in Chicago, 1916.On May 21, 1919, the US House of Representatives passed the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing American women the right to vote. Two weeks later, the Senate followed. The amendment was ratified and adopted, one year later on August 18, 1920. Getting to this historic moment took an almost century- long effort of lecturing, writing, marching, lobbying, and practicing civil disobedience for many women and their allies. Some of these influential players were from South Carolina, including the Grimke sisters , Rollin sisters and Pollitzer sisters .

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