Laura Hunsberger

Narrative: A Family Reflects on the Significance of Adoption

By Laura Hunsberger

Patty Lozon, Amanda Lozon, and Bill Lozon, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Amanda Lozon spoke with her parents, Patty and Bill Lozon. Also her grandparents, Patty and Bill adopted Amanda and raised her from age twelve. Here, Patty and Bill tell Amanda what the experience was like.

Narrative: Turning Up All the Stones

By Laura Hunsberger

Brooke Howard and Barbara Howard, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Barbara Howard spoke with her daughter, Brooke Howard, about her late husband, James William Howard, who was a "one in a million" father to Brooke and her siblings. Here, Brooke asks her mom to share some memories from the early years in their relationship.

Narrative: "Oh, Those Were Yummy Days!"

By Laura Hunsberger

Ann Edwards and Thomas Edwards, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project that collects the voices of our times. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Thomas and Ann Edwards sat down to talk about their marriage and the family they made together over 50 years. They both grew up in South Carolina, and here Ann and Thomas remember childhood in the 1950s and their own grandparents.

Narrative: "It Was Like We Hit Lightning in a Bottle"

By Laura Hunsberger

Hippie Torrales in his early days as a DJ in New Jersey.

This edition of Narrative features an interview with Columbia resident Hippie Torrales, who came of age in New Jersey with the dream of becoming a professional DJ. By age 20 he was mainstay of the New Jersey club scene, opening one of the biggest clubs of the era, Zanzibar. Here, Hippie explains how he and his contemporaries became the innovators of a new musical style in the 1980s.

Gil Goldstein on Piano Jazz

By Laura Hunsberger

Gil Goldstein

Composer and arranger Gil Goldstein came to the piano by way of the accordion, which he has rediscovered and added to the jazz lexicon. Collaborations with Jaco Pistorius and Bill Evans fostered his career and led to work with David Sanborn, Michael Franks, and Al Jarreau, among others, and to writing original scores for films. In this 2001 Piano Jazz session, Goldstein solos on his own “City Lights.” McPartland accompanies him as he plays accordion for a few tunes, including “Waltz for Debbie.”

Narrative: "A Lot Like Grandma"

By Laura Hunsberger

Shannon Bobertz and her daughter, Sarah, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Shannon Bobertz spoke with her nine-year-old daughter Sarah about her grandmother, Ann Longwell Furr, who passed away a month before this interview.

Narrative: The Best Wedding Gift

By Laura Hunsberger

Kelvin and Chanta Moore, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Kelvin Moore and his wife Chanta Moore remembered how their relationship grew as they got used to living together for the first time.

Narrative: A Daughter's Love Passed Down

By Laura Hunsberger

Tonya German and her mother Nancy Wegner, Columbia 2016

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Tonya German spoke with her mother Nancy Wegner about her early life, starting with the last time Nancy saw her own mother as a child. Here’s Tonya.

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