Kaitlyn Cannon

Made Here | Family Business Creates Handmade Baskets

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Handmade

Handmade is a family-owned and operated basket-making company that has existed for over 20 years. The business was previously owned by Jeff Long's mother and father, before being passed down to him and his wife, Becca, during his parents' retirement.

Made Here | Sustainable Wall Decor

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Wildly Urban Wall Decor

Wildly Urban is a company that creates hand-crafted air plant decor using reclaimed wood and salvaged leather. Owner Carrie Gordon discusses her passion for sustainability. She explains, "I came up with this idea after my husband started his business and we had a lot of leftover wood pieces laying around that he was either going to trash or burn.

City-wide Greenville Art Project | PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Butterflies

Artist Yuri Tsuzuki created The Butterfly project, which is an art project that emcompasses the entire City of Greenvile, and which took her five years to complete. It was just finished last year. Tsuzuki mentions how the City of Greenville used to be a textile community, and how it has transformed since then. She explains her decision to use butterflies in her artwork, saying, "The buttefly transforms itself. What a great metaphor for the City of Greenville."

Made Here | Hand-made Quilts

By Kaitlyn Cannon

The Quilted Rose Co.

The Quilted Rose Co. is a company that specializes in the creation of hand-made quilts. Business owner Ruth Hong began quilting when she was  thirteen years old, and opened her quilt shop shortly after graduating from high school. One of her customers, Shelley Boomhower, explains that she is impressed that Hong uses a sewing machine instead of a Long Arm quilting machine. "I was really surprised, and I have to admit a little skeptical," Boomhower says.

ETV Carolinas Hosts Annual Science Bowl

By Kaitlyn Cannon

ETV Carolinas Annual Science Bowl

Chatter can be heard throughout the hallways of ETV Carolinas as 5th-grade students excitedly make their way into the studio. They rush to their seats, surrounded by three studio cameras and studio lights shining down on their faces. This isn't a scene they're used to, but they don't let that make them nervous. After studying and preparing for the quiz show for weeks, the students smile eagerly at the camera, anxiously awaiting their TV debut.

Made Here | The Beverage-Filled Tote Bag

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Swankey Tote Bag

The Swankey is a fully-functioning tote bag that has a cooler compartment. The creator, Tracey Luebbers from Lake Wylie, explains how she came up with the idea. She says, "I came up with the idea in 2011 and headed to our community pool one afternoon. I was carrying a tote bag, my purse, and a cooler. All of this stuff was really hard to carry. I thought to myself, simply, wouldn't it be nice if there was a better way?" 

PBS NewHour Student Reporting Labs and FrogWatch USA

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Legacy Charter Early College Student Reporting Lab

It was a rainy and hazy Saturday morning in Greenville, South Carolina as student journalists from Legacy Charter Early College High School walked into the building of FrogWatch USA's volunteer training meeting. During the training meeting, the volunteers were learning how to correctly monitor frog and toad sounds. As the students set up their cameras and began recording the meeting, different frog and toad calls echoed throughout the room.

Made Here | Homemade Wreaths

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Shavon's Creations Wreaths

Shavon's Creations is a craft business based in Sumter, South Carolina. When discussing the products she sells, Shavon Turner, owner of Shavon's Creations, says "Pretty much, if you bring me an idea, I can do it." Her mission for her business is "just to create something someone loves...I just want to create something beautiful for someone."

Made Here | Stone Ground Southern Grits

By Kaitlyn Cannon

Grits at Geechie Boy Mill

Geechie Boy Mill is a mill in Edisto Island, South Carolina that supplies markets and restaurants around the country with their heirloom crops and small batch grits. Owner of Geechie Boy Mill, Greg Johnsman, believes preserving history when making grits is important. He says, "The Identity of these sea islands is these farmers before us." In fact, Geechie Boy Mill was named after the farmer who owned the land before the Johnsmans.

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