Jeff Huffman

The Hurricane Forecast Meteorologists Don't Want You to See

By Jeff Huffman

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Fewer hurricanes are expected this year than the last two seasons, according to renowned researcher Dr. Phil Klotzbach of Colorado State University. However, both of those seasons far outperformed expectations.

Even Phil doesn't have much confidence in his forecast this time of year.

“So our skill in April is modest, and that's because the hurricane season doesn't start until June and then doesn't ramp up until August. So obviously there's a lot that could change in the atmosphere and ocean,” he says.

 

 

 

Rain Chances Return Next Four Days

By Jeff Huffman

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The sun was in rare form Monday across South Carolina. It was out the entire day!

Much of the state has experienced a prolong period of gloomy skies since the middle of the month. Columbia, for example, hadn't had a day with more than 50 percent sunshine since February 14th. The pattern finally broke Monday, as high pressure nosed in from the Ohio Valley and allowed drier, cooler air to spill in from the north.

 

 

 

Growing Risk of Flash Flooding in Upstate South Carolina This Week

By Jeff Huffman

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Keep the umbrellas, rain jackets and galoshes handy. The extended forecast in upstate South Carolina is for rain, more rain. And then, more rain. So much water may fall that flash flooding will be a concern, forecasters at the National Weather Service Greenville-Spartanburg office said in a special weather statement Sunday.

El Niño is Here and it's Already Affecting South Carolina

By Jeff Huffman

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Scientists at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center have officially declared an El Niño. It is a natural warming over the water in the eastern and/or Central Pacific Ocean that occurs every 2 to 7 years. The El Niño is expected to be weak and forecasters at the government agency say there's only slightly greater than an even bet that it will even last through the spring.

Flash Flood and Severe Weather Risk in Eastern South Carolina Friday

By Jeff Huffman

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Yet another strong storm system is approaching the Palmetto State. On a weekend, of course. But this one will bring all rain. And a lot of it.

 

 

 

A Flash Flood Watch has been issued for the Pee Dee region of South Carolina through Saturday afternoon, where two to four inches of rain is expected in this region. While that isn't a large or record-setting amount of rain, it will fall on already saturated soil. And since the rain will be heavy at times, it could produce flash flooding, especially in poor drainage areas near creeks, streams and ditches.

Season's First Winter Storm Arrives Sunday

By Jeff Huffman

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The season's first winter storm is poised to move into portions of upstate South Carolina Sunday, where several inches of snow and sleet are expected. 

 

 

 

A Winter Storm Warning is in effect through midday Monday for areas along and west of the I-85 corridor from Anderson to Spartanburg. The warning extends east to include Laurens, Union, Chester, York and Lancaster counties of north-central South Carolina.  

Tropical Storm Michael Moving Away Quickly

By Jeff Huffman

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Flash flooding and tornadoes are the remaining risks from Tropical Storm Michael as it exits the Palmetto State Thursday afternoon. The heaviest rain is likely to fall in northern sections of the midlands and upstate regions, whereas the tornado risk is greatest in the PeeDee low country through early afternoon.

Florence Still Crawling as Catastrophic Flooding Continues

By Jeff Huffman

Additional Rain Florence

There IS an end in sight. It’s just not anytime soon for those that need it the most.

Even though all tropical storm warnings have been cancelled, the persistent heavy rain and flash flooding from Tropical Storm Florence will continue for several more hours in portions of North and South Carolina.

The heavy rain and flood risk will then spread across the Mid-State of North Carolina and areas along and north of I-20 in South Carolina Saturday Night.  

Florence: It's Now All About the Flooding

By Jeff Huffman

Predicted path.

Hurricane Florence has slowed and is now crawling to the west at 6 mph. Life-threatening storm surge, inland flooding, and wind damage are imminent along the coast of North Carolina from Wilmington to the Outer Banks and stretching to northern portions of South Carolina through the day on Friday. Florence is forecast to move southwest along the coastline before turning to the northeast on Sunday.

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