Jeff Huffman

Severe Thunderstorm Watch Issued for All of South Carolina Saturday

By Jeff Huffman

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Clusters of thunderstorms are expected to rapidly develop across the Palmetto State Saturday afternoon, posing a risk of wind damage and hail.

 

In a midday update from the Storm Prediction Center Saturday, forecasters upgraded areas of the Midlands and Upstate regions to an “enhanced” risk (level 3 out of 5) for wind damage.

Severe Thunderstorm Watch for All of South Carolina Until 10 pm

By Jeff Huffman

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Update 5:15 pm Thursday: Severe storms are moving out of the Columbia metro area. However, they continue near North Augusta and are approaching Sumter. Additional storms are approaching Interstate 95 from the Florence area southward toward Berkeley and Dorchester counties. Damaging winds in excess of 60 mph, frequent lightning, and torrential rain are likely. Storms will approach the Grand Strand (in Georgetown and Horry counties) between now and 6:30 PM.

Flash Flood Watch Issued for Lowcountry Wednesday

By Jeff Huffman

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Flash flooding is possible in the South Carolina Lowcountry Tuesday night and Wednesday, thanks to multiple rounds of showers and t-storms likely to hit the same areas over a short amount of time.

The National Weather Service in Charleston issued a Flash Flood Watch Tuesday afternoon for the counties of Hampton, Colleton, Dorchester, Berkeley, Charleston, Beaufort, and Jasper. The watch is in effect until 6 pm Wednesday.
 

 

 

 

Flash Flood Watch Issued for the Upstate through Sunday

By Jeff Huffman

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The risk of repeating rounds of heavy rain has forecasters in the South Carolina Upstate concerned about flash flooding. The National Weather Service offices in Columbia and Greenville-Spartanburg have issued a Flash Flood Watch for areas along the I-85 corridor, extending south to Greenwood and east to Cheraw. The communities of Anderson and Chesterfield are also included in the Flash Flood Watch. According to a blend of radar data and rain gauge observations, anywhere from 2 to 4 inches of rain has fallen over the past two days in many areas.

Hurricane Season Begins with No South Carolina Threat

By Jeff Huffman

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Saturday marks the official start of the 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season, and the second named storm of the year could already be developing. However, it poses no current threat to the United States.

Historic Heat Expected Over the Holiday Weekend

By Jeff Huffman

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The Palmetto State will be sizzling this Memorial Day Weekend, and the heat could be historic. Record highs dating back to the 1950's and 60's are in jeopardy of being broken or tied in several cities by Monday.

Triple-digit temperatures are forecast across the Midlands starting Saturday, with a high up to 101° possible in Columbia by Memorial Day. Even temperatures across the Upstate are expected to shatter records. Forecast highs in Spartanburg are 3 to 5 degrees above the daily records Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.

The Hurricane Forecast Meteorologists Don't Want You to See

By Jeff Huffman

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Fewer hurricanes are expected this year than the last two seasons, according to renowned researcher Dr. Phil Klotzbach of Colorado State University. However, both of those seasons far outperformed expectations.

Even Phil doesn't have much confidence in his forecast this time of year.

“So our skill in April is modest, and that's because the hurricane season doesn't start until June and then doesn't ramp up until August. So obviously there's a lot that could change in the atmosphere and ocean,” he says.

 

 

 

Rain Chances Return Next Four Days

By Jeff Huffman

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The sun was in rare form Monday across South Carolina. It was out the entire day!

Much of the state has experienced a prolong period of gloomy skies since the middle of the month. Columbia, for example, hadn't had a day with more than 50 percent sunshine since February 14th. The pattern finally broke Monday, as high pressure nosed in from the Ohio Valley and allowed drier, cooler air to spill in from the north.

 

 

 

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