Jackie Johnson

Technology at Allen University

By Jackie Johnson

computer

Palmetto Scene visits Allen University, a historic black university in Columbia, where students are excited about using their knowledge to secure high- paying, interesting jobs in the 21st-century workplace.

This story is part of the Tell Them We Are Rising #HBCURising campaign, supported by the American Graduate: Let's Make It Happen public media initiative.

Tell Them We Are Rising premieres on Independent Lens on PBS on February 19, 2018.
 

The Reverend Jesse Jackson

By Jackie Johnson

Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson was born in Greenville, South Carolina.  Living under Jim Crow segregation laws, Jackson was taught to go to the back of the bus and use separate water fountains, practices he says he accepted until the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955.

He attended the racially segregated Sterling High School in Greenville, where he was elected student class president, finished tenth in his class, and earned letters in baseball, football and basketball.

Matthew Perry Jr

By Jackie Johnson

Matthew Perry Jr

Matthew J. Perry, was Born in Columbia, South Carolina in 1921. Perry, who excelled academically, attended local segregated schools and started college, at historically black South Carolina State College, located in Orangeburg, South Carolina, studying business.

He served during World War II in the United States Army from 1943 to 1946. He finished college after the war, receiving a Bachelor of Science degree from South Carolina State College in 1948.

VOICES FROM VIETNAM: Reflecting at the Wall

By Jackie Johnson

Soldiers in Vietnam

The voices we hear are those who were sent to Vietnam to fight in a war far from home. Some volunteered, some volunteered because they knew their draft was inevitable and wanted some control over where they would go, and some were drafted against their will. Their young lives were changed dramatically by the experience of suddenly finding themselves in a war zone with a ruthless enemy trying to kill them in a new form of guerrilla war.

Septima Clark

By Jackie Johnson

Septima Clark

Septima Poinsette Clark was known as the “Queen Mother” or “Grandmother” of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Martin Luther King, Jr., commonly referred to Ms. Clark, as “The Mother of the Movement”.

Born in Charleston, SC, in 1898, Septima’s life was greatly influenced by “reconstruction”.  Charleston was strictly segregated and divided by class.

Marian Wright Edelman

By Jackie Johnson

Marian Wright Edelman

Marian Wright Edelman, is founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund (CDF), considered by many, the nation’s strongest voice for children and families.

Born in Bennettsville, SC, in 1939, Marian is a graduate of Historically Black Spelman College, located in Atlanta, Georgia.  She would go on to graduate from Yale University Law School, and become the first African-American woman admitted to the Mississippi Bar.

Maude Callen

By Jackie Johnson

Maude Callen

This episode is about Maude Callen (1898 -- 1990), a Nurse-Midwife, who singlehandedly brought health care to rural Pineville, S.C. and the surrounding area of Berkeley County in the early 1920s, continuing to the 1970s. The episode will tell how she delivered some 800 babies, and trained some 400 women as midwives in depressing, treacherous conditions. Many share their memories of Maude Callen and the invaluable medical service she provided as nurse and doctor to thousands in this low income area of South Carolina for generations.

Mary McLeod Bethune

By Jackie Johnson

Mary McLeod Bethune

If there were a Mount Rushmore for African-Americans, Mary McLeod Bethune would definitely be on there.  She is hailed as one of the most influential African-American educators and Civil Rights figures, during the first half of the 20th century.

Mary Jane McLeod Bethune was born on July 10th, 1875, on a cotton farm in Mayesville, South Carolina, the 15th out of 17 Children born to Samuel and Patsy McIntosh McLeod, former slaves. Deeply religious and achieving academically…young Mary knew that there was something powerful about education that she wanted to master.