Betsy Newman

RECONSTRUCTION 360 | What Reconstruction Meant to Freedwomen

By Betsy Newman

FreedwomenUnder slavery many African-American women had to work as field hands, or in the slave owners’ homes, doing domestic chores and raising the white children. Freedom meant that black women became mistresses of their own homes and could devote themselves to their families and communities. Reconstruction 360 is a digital educational program that explores Reconstruction history through humanities themes. This module, 40 Acres and a Mule, focuses on the theme of land and labor as experienced by freedpeople at the close of the Civil War. Set in South Carolina, it features 360-degree interactive video...

RECONSTRUCTION 360 | White Landowners and the Transition to Free Labor

By Betsy Newman

White LandownerAfter the war, the South, and the nation, faced the question of how to make the transition from slave to free labor. Most former slave owners insisted that they should get their land back and maintain control over their workers, even if they had to use force. Freedpeople were determined to be their own masters, never to be treated as slaves again. Reconstruction 360 is a digital educational program that explores Reconstruction history through humanities themes. This module, 40 Acres and a Mule, focuses on the theme of land and labor as experienced by freedpeople at the close of the Civil War...

RECONSTRUCTION 360 | The Role of the Freedmen’s Bureau

By Betsy Newman

Freedmen’s Bureau The Freedmen’s Bureau had responsibility for every aspect of the lives of formerly enslaved people, and was in charge of land that came under federal control during and after the Civil War. In 1872, Congress shut the Freedmen’s Bureau down, but today Freedmen's Bureau records are a vital resource for anyone seeking information about African-American history in the post-Civil War and Reconstruction eras. Reconstruction 360 is a digital educational program that explores Reconstruction history through humanities themes. This module, 40 Acres and a Mule, focuses on the theme of land and labor as...

RECONSTRUCTION 360 | The Importance Of Land To Freedpeople

By Betsy Newman

White landowner on horseAfter the war, the South, and the nation, faced the question of how to make the transition from slave to free labor. Most former slave owners insisted that they should get their land back and maintain control over their workers, even if they had to use force. Freedpeople were determined to be their own masters, never to be treated as slaves again. Reconstruction 360 is a digital educational program that explores Reconstruction history through humanities themes. This module, 40 Acres and a Mule, focuses on the theme of land and labor as experienced by freedpeople at the close of the Civil War...

RECONSTRUCTION 360 | The Impact of Reconstruction on Children’s Lives

By Betsy Newman

African American family - Reconstruction eraEnslaved people did not have full rights to their children, or control over their lives. When freedom came, parents could take an active role in the upbringing of their children, leading to stronger parental bonds and more stable families. Reconstruction 360 is a digital educational program that explores Reconstruction history through humanities themes. This module, 40 Acres and a Mule, focuses on the theme of land and labor as experienced by freedpeople at the close of the Civil War. Set in South Carolina, it features 360-degree interactive video and short documentaries, and includes lesson...

RECONSTRUCTION 360 | Forty Acres and a Mule

By Betsy Newman

Kate MasurHistorian Kate Masur explains the origins of 40 Acres and a Mule, a famous phrase that many have heard but may not fully understand. It originated in the early days of Reconstruction, when General Sherman issued Field Order 15, giving thousands of freed people abandoned land along the coast of South Carolina and Georgia. Reconstruction 360 is a digital educational program that explores Reconstruction history through humanities themes. This module, 40 Acres and a Mule, focuses on the theme of land and labor as experienced by freedpeople at the close of the Civil War. Set in South Carolina, it...

RECONSTRUCTION 360 | Descendants Face Loss of Historic Land to Development

By Betsy Newman

Freewood FarmsReconstruction 360 is built on a 360 degree video platform that features a reenactment set on a farm in 1865. The reenactment was shot at Freewoods Farm, a living farm museum in the Freewoods community near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Today, the descendants of the founders of the Freewoods face loss of their historic land to development. Reconstruction 360 is a digital educational program that explores Reconstruction history through humanities themes. This module, 40 Acres and a Mule, focuses on the theme of land and labor as experienced by freedpeople at the close of the Civil War. Set in...

Reconstruction 360

By Betsy Newman

Reconstruction 360 splash pageReconstruction 360 is SCETV’s new web and mobile application that brings contemporary scholarship about Reconstruction to a project designed for mobile devices.

Charlie's Place

By Betsy Newman

Staff at Charlie's PlaceCarolina Stories: Charlie’s Place Charlie’s Place , tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South. The owner, Charlie Fitzgerald, welcomed blacks and whites to his club. From the 1930s to the 1960s, many of the greatest black musicians played there, including Billie Holiday, Ray Charles, Ruth Brown and Little Richard. In 1950 Charlie’s Place was attacked by the Ku Klux Klan and Charlie Fitzgerald was beaten and left for dead by the side of the road. Charlie’s Place closed in 1965,...

Ernest Finney

By Betsy Newman

Ernest Finney PhotographErnest A. Finney, Jr. (1931-2017) was South Carolina’s first appointed African-American Supreme Court Justice, since Reconstruction. Born 1931 in Smithfield, Virginia, his mother died when he was an infant. He was reared by his father, Dr. Ernest Finney, Sr., an educator who eventually moved to Orangeburg, SC, and became Dean of Historically Black Claflin College. Young Ernest Finney, Jr. graduated from Orangeburg-Wilkerson High School, then, earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Historically Black Claflin College in 1952. He then enrolled in historically black South Carolina State College's...

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