Amanda McNulty

Controlling the European Hornet

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow! Minute logo

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Like the Cicada Killer wasp, the large European Hornet also collects insects to feed its larvae, a beneficial habit, but sadly it has a destructive activity of girdling twigs. Removing the bark allows the adults to access the nutritious exuding sap and to collect fiber to build its nest. If the twig is completely girdled, the portion above it dies, a condition called flagging, which makes the plant unsightly and you’ll want to prune away the dead wood.

Man and Dog Attacked by... Hummingbird-Sized Wasp?

By Amanda McNulty

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Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. It sounds like a tabloid headline – man and dog frantically escape from huge flying wasp! But it’s a true story—I got an email from a gentleman saying that he and his dog was dive bombed by a hummingbird sized wasp that sent them fleeing into the safety of their house.

Cicada Killer Wasps

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow! Minute logo

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  Recently, a Sumter County Master   noticed silver dollar-sized holes in her yard with soil piled up at one end and wondered if it was a mole or vole burrow, but there weren’t any of the usual above  ground runs you’d expect to find. At the same time, she found a dead wasp on her porch and brought that to the office. Bingo! She had already solved the puzzle herself.

Eradicating Yellow Jackets Might Best Be Left to Professionals

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow! Minute logo

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Unlike the European honey bee which can only sting once, Yellow jackets, which are far more aggressive, have a smooth stinger and can sting you over and over again. Most yellow jacket nests are constructed in the ground, they chew fiber to make cells in which the queen lays eggs, and they are usually partially concealed under decaying tree roots or the protective structure of shrubs and bushes.

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