Amanda McNulty

The Pros and Cons of Black Cherry and Cherry Laurel

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow logo

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Both Prunus serotina, black cherry, and Prunus caroliniana, cherry laurel, contain prussic acid, cyanide, and the wilted leaves especially are harmful to horses and cattle. If you crush the leaves of black cherry, you can really smell that acrid compound. On the other hand, if you rub cherry laurel glossy evergreen leaves together between your hands, they smell just like maraschino cherries.

Mistletoe in Past Cultures

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow logo

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Parasitic plants with the common name mistletoe occur almost worldwide and in many cultures were associated with myths and pagan religious rites. The Scottish anthropologist Sir James George Frazer wrote a comparative study of mythology and religion. In his book The Golden Bough which is one of the common names for mistletoe, he wrote extensively about the European mistletoe, Viscum album.

Mistletoe: a Holiday History

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow logo

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. While filming at Historic Columbia recently, I learned that it wasn’t until the 1850’s that British and American Christians began seriously decorating their homes for Christmas. Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert, brought his Germanic holiday traditions to England. Along with decorating a tree came the custom of hanging mistletoe over a doorway.

Making It Grow Extra: Mulching

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute Extra logo

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and host of Making It Grow  is joined by Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery in Greenville, SC. This chat is about how plants are capable of mulching themselves once established. However, providing mulch during their establishment period is critical.

Making It Grow Extra: Retail Nurserys

By Amanda McNulty

Davis Sanders

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and host of Making It Grow  is joined by Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery in Greenville, SC. This chat is about how retail nurseries are in the business of providing products for consumers and how their job is to satisfy the customers' wants while also educating them as to what they need and why.

 

"Sunburned" Vegetables and Fruits

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. My new sunscreen has zinc oxide in it; it actually forms a physical barrier to protect my skin from sunburn. Believe it or not, sunburn is a serious issue for many fruits and vegetables, too. Sunburn necrosis occurs when vegetable’s skin or peel which receives direct sunlight reaches a certain temperature and the tissue is killed. It’s the temperature of the fruit’s skin – not the air temperature – that’s critical.

Keeping That Yard Under Control

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. My two- and-a half acre yard is getting to be more than I can handle. When we moved here, thirty-three years ago, most of it was an old field, with just two large beds of camellias and an island of pines. We hired someone to bush hog it several times each summer and had just a small area to cut with a push mower. With youthful enthusiasm, I changed that by planting beds of assorted shrubs and trees, large and small.

Best Practices for Planting a Tree

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  Mulching trees is the best thing you can after you’ve planted them properly; some research shows it can double the rate of growth for  newly established trees. A good tip when mulching trees is to think of doughnuts – there’s a hole in the middle. Mulch should start from four to six inches away from the tree’s trunk, if it touches the trunk it promotes disease and decay.

The National Park Service's Exotic Plants Management Teams

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The National Park Service staff wear a variety of hats. One responsibility that we might not think of is keeping invasive species at bay in what are described as some of the most iconic and ecologically important areas of the country. The Exotic Plant Management Teams were created to meet this challenge. Among the plants they must battle are Asian wistarias which overtake trees and shrubs in many locales. Here is their description of the damage they’ve observed.

City Planners Unwittingly Create a Haven for Gall Damage

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.   History is filled with examples of municipalities choosing a favorite species for their main street trees to devastating results.  Central Park In the early 1980’s was  losing more than 100 elms every year.   In Denver, 1.45 million ash trees will die from the Emerald Ash Borer unless they are treated every two years with a systemic insecticide.

Pages