African American History

New SC Film “Charlie’s Place” Premieres April 26 on SCETV

April 22, 2018 - Posted in SCETV by Glenn Rawls
The staff of Charlie's Place.

Charlie’s Place , a new South Carolina ETV documentary, tells the story of an African-American nightclub owned by Charlie and Sarah Fitzgerald in Myrtle Beach, S.C. from the 1930s to the 1960s. Charlie’s Place on Carver Street was a significant stop for musicians on the...

Charlie's Place

April 9, 2018 - Posted in Carolina Stories by Betsy Newman
Staff at Charlie's Place

Carolina Stories: Charlie’s Place premieres on April 26, 2018 at 9:00 pm. The program will repeat on April 29 at 4:00 pm. SCETV’s upcoming documentary, Charlie’s Place , tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina that was a significant...

Robert Smalls

February 22, 2018 - Posted in SC Hall of Fame
Robert Smalls

In 1862, Robert Smalls, an enslaved crew-member of the CSS Planter, steals the boat, sails it past the heavily armed defenses of Charleston Harbor in South Carolina and delivers it into the hands of the Union forces further out. The bold act makes Smalls a hero in the North...

Ronald Erwin McNair

February 15, 2018 - Posted in SC Hall of Fame
Ronald Erwin McNair

Inducted into the South Carolina Hall Of Fame, Ronald McNair was the second African-American to go into space, and was part of the STS-51L crew that died when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after lift-off in 1986.

February 6, 1968 - All Star Bowling Lanes Protest Turns Violent

February 14, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Beryl Dakers
Dr. Emma McCain

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ordered all public places and schools to desegregate and serve blacks and whites equally. For four years, from 1964 to 1968, Orangeburg's All Star Bowling Lanes refused to obey the Act and continued to turn away African Americans On February 6,...

Orangeburg Massacre: A Conversation with Henry Smith's Sister

February 8, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Beryl Dakers
Ora Sue Smith Hughes

Ora Sue Smith Hughes shares memories about her brother, Henry Smith (1948-1968), one of the three slain victims in the Orangeburg Massacre. South Carolina State College student Henry Smith had an interest in the growing civil rights movement, admiring leaders like Martin...

Orangeburg Massacre: South Carolina and National Response to Tragedy

February 8, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Beryl Dakers
Police officers with guns

Representative James E. Clyburn sits down with South Carolina ETV to talk about the country and South Carolina's response to the Orangeburg Massacre. Clyburn also compares how the Kent State shooting of 1970, which occurred two years after the Orangeburg Massacre, received...

The Orangeburg Massacre: Alumni Discuss Lifelong Effects and the FBI Investigation

February 8, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Ty Moody
Fifty years later,  SC State University Alumni gather for a conversation about the lifelong effects of the Orangeburg Massacre a

Fifty years later, South Carolina State University (SCSU) Alumni gather for a conversation about the lifelong effects of the Orangeburg Massacre and the final FBI investigation report. On the evening of February 8, 1968, SCSU students started a bonfire on the front of...

David Drake aka “Dave the Potter”

February 8, 2018 - Posted in SC Hall of Fame
Dave the Potter

David Drake was an enslaved African American in Edgefield, South Carolina during the first three quarters of the nineteenth century. He’s known today for the magnificent quality of the pots he made, the size of the pots, and he wrote poems on some of his pots—during an era...

The Orangeburg Massacre 50 Years Later: Remembrances

February 7, 2018 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Ty Moody
SC State University Alumni gather for a conversation about the tragic event that occurred on February 8, 1968.

South Carolina State University (SCSU) Alumni gather for a conversation about the tragic event that occurred on February 8, 1968. Fifty years ago, SCSU students started a bonfire on the front of campus which is located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. As police and...

The Education of Harvey Gantt

January 8, 2018 - Posted in Carolina Stories by Ty Moody
The Education of Harvey Gantt

In 1960, a talented African-American student from Charleston, Harvey Gantt, graduated from high school and decided to become an architect. Clemson College was the only school in South Carolina that offered a degree in his chosen field. In January of 1963, with the help of...

Historic Marker Helps Uncover Military History Buried at Columbia Cemetery

December 18, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Thelisha Eaddy
An historic marker honoring the 371st Infantry now stands at Childs Cemetery in Columbia.

For those who love military history, the date September 28, now carries an additional significance. It’s the date Cpl. Freddie Stowers was killed in battle. Stowers was an Anderson County native and a member of the 371st Infantry Regiment, the first African-American unit to...

Ernest Finney (1931-2017)

December 4, 2017 - Posted in SC Hall of Fame by Betsy Newman
Ernest Finney Photograph

Ernest A. Finney, Jr. was South Carolina’s first appointed African-American Supreme Court Justice, since Reconstruction. Born 1931 in Smithfield, Virginia, his mother died when he was an infant. He was reared by his father, Dr. Ernest Finney, Sr., an educator who eventually...

"B" is for Benedict College

November 7, 2017 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
South Carolina From A to Z

"B" is for Benedict College. A historically black college in Columbia, Benedict was founded by Rhode Island native Bathsheba Benedict. Benedict purchased an eighty-acre tract with the goal of educating recently emancipated African-Americans. Originally named Benedict...

The Reverend Jesse Jackson

October 26, 2017 - Posted in HBCU Rising by Jackie Johnson
Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson was born in Greenville, South Carolina. Living under Jim Crow segregation laws, Jackson was taught to go to the back of the bus and use separate water fountains, practices he says he accepted until the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955. He attended the racially...

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