South Carolina ETV

Walter Edgar's Journal

A Conversation about the South


Friday - May 02, 2014


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About This Show

Walter Edgar’s Journal listeners have a front row seat for a public “Conversation about the South,” held in March of 2014 by the American History Book Club and Forum at the Upcountry History Museum – Furman University, in Greenville, SC. Long-time friends and colleagues, Professor James Cobb of the University of Georgia and USC Professor Emeritus Walter Edgar have a wide-ranging conversation about the American South—past, present, and future. 


Brown v. Board of Education - Landmark Court Ruling to End Public School Segregation


Friday - April 25, 2014


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About This Show

In 1949 Thurgood Marshall and NAACP officials met with Black residents of Clarendon County, SC. They decided that the NAACP would launch a test case against segregation in public schools if at least 20 plaintiffs could be found. By November, Harry Briggs and 19 other plaintiffs were assembled, and the NAACP filed a class action lawsuit against the Clarendon County School Board.

Briggs v. Elliott became one of the cases consolidated by the Supreme Court into Brown v. Board of Education, the case in which the Court made its landmark ruling in 1954 to end segregation in public schools. Fifty years on from Brown v. Board, Dr. Jon N. Hale, of the College of Charleston, and Dr. Millicent E. Brown, of Claflin University, join Dr. Edgar to talk about the road to school desegregation and civil rights in South Carolina.


Pat Conroy and Family - The Death of Santini


Friday - April 18, 2014


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About This Show

In his 2013 memoir, The Death of Santini (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday) author Pat Conroy admits that his father, Don, is the basis of abusive fighter pilot he created for the title role of his novel, The Great Santini, and that his mother, Peg, and his brothers and sisters have all served as models for characters in The Prince of Tides and his other novels. Now, for the first time, Pat gathers with four of his surviving siblings, Kathy, Tim, Mike, and Jim, to talk about the intersection of “real life” and Pat’s fiction, and what it was like to grow up with “the Great Santini” as a father.


Conversations on the Civil War, 1864: Lee’s Miserables


Sunday - April 13, 2014


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About This Show

Sunday, April 13, only

(Originally broadcast 02/07/14) - Never did so large a proportion of the American population leave home for an extended period and produce such a detailed record of its experiences in the form of correspondence, diaries, and other papers as during the Civil War. Dr. Tracy Power’s book, Lee’s Miserables: Life in the Army of Northern Virginia from the Wilderness to Appomattox (UNC Press), offers a compelling social history of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during its final year, from May 1864 to April 1865—a history based on research in more than 1,200 wartime letters and diaries by more than 400 Confederate officers and enlisted men.

Dr. Power joined Dr. Edgar for a public conversation at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 14, 2014. The event was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.


It’s our Spring Membership Drive!


Friday - April 11, 2014


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About This Show

Today we'll be listening to clips of some of our favorite past shows, and offering you a chance to pledge your financial support to Walter Edgar's Journal.


An Evening with Pat Conroy


Friday - April 04, 2014


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About This Show

Pat Conroy, author of The Water is WideThe Great SantiniThe Prince of Tides, The Death of Santini, joins Dr. Walter Edgar for an event celebrating the author’s life;  his work; and One Book, One Columbia’s 2014 selection, My Reading Life (Nan A. Talese, 2010). The conversation was recorded before an audience of over 2000, at Columbia’s Township Auditorium, on the evening of February 27.


The South Carolina Botanical Garden - Patrick McMillan and John Bodiford


Friday - March 28, 2014


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About This Show

The South Carolina Botanical Gardens, located on the campus of Clemson University, is a diverse 295-acre garden of natural and manicured landscapes within the South Carolina Piedmont ecosystem.  Director Patrick McMillan and Manager John Bodiford will join Dr. Edgar to talk about the Gardens. They will also discuss the ongoing restoration following the remarkably heavy rain which flooded the Garden and its related facilities in 2013. 


Conversations on the Civil War, 1864: Plain Folk on the Home Front


Friday - March 21, 2014


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About This Show

Dr. Melissa Walker is the author of numerous books on the Civil War and is co-editor of Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War (USC Press, 2011). She will talk with Dr. Edgar about the role of “plain folk”—especially women—during the war.

This presentation was recorded at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 28, and was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.


“What I Came to Tell You” - Tommy Hays


Friday - March 14, 2014


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About This Show

Since his mother died earlier this year, Grover Johnston has watched his family fall to pieces as his father throws himself into his work rather than dealing with the pain. Left to care for his younger sister, Sudie, Grover finds solace in creating intricate weavings out of the natural materials found in the bamboo forest behind his North Carolina home, a pursuit that his father sees only as a waste of time.

But as tensions mount between father and son, two unlikely forces conspire to lead the Johnstons on a new path -- a presence that seems to come to Grover in his darkest moments and new tenants in the rental house across the street who have come from deep in the Carolina hills and plopped themselves right into Grover's life.

Tender, touching, and utterly compelling, What I Came to Tell You (Egmont USA, 2013), the first middle-grade novel from critically acclaimed Asheville author Tommy Hays, is a story of grief, love, and hard-won redemption. He joins Dr. Edgar to talk about the book, and about his career.


Conversations on the Civil War, 1864: The War at Sea


Friday - March 07, 2014


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About This Show

Dr. Craig L. Symonds is a retired professor of history at the United States Naval Academy and the author of The Civil War at Sea (Oxford University Press, New York, 2012) ) and numerous other books. He joins Dr. Edgar to talk about the navies on both sides of the conflict, the impact of emergent technologies, the effectiveness of the Union's ambitious strategy of blockading, the odyssey of Confederate commerce raiders, the role of naval forces on the western rivers, and the difficulty of conducting combined sea and ground operations against the major Southern port cities.

The presentation was recorded at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on February 4, and was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.


The Minus Times - Hunter Kennedy


Friday - February 28, 2014


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About This Show

Begun as an open letter to strangers and fellow misfits, The Minus Times grew to become a hand-typed literary magazine that showcased the next generation of American fiction. Contributors include Sam Lipsyte, David Berman, Patrick DeWitt, and Wells Tower, with illustrations by David Eggers and Brad Neely as well as interviews with Dan Clowes, Barry Hannah, and a yet-to-be-famous Stephen Colbert. With sly humor and striking illustrations, The Minus Times has earned a fervent following as much for its lack of literary pretension as its sporadic appearances on the newsstand. All thirty of the nearly-impossible-to-find issues of this improvised literary almanac are now assembled for the first time, typos and all, in The Minus Times Collected, by Hunter Kennedy (Featherproof Books, 2012).


Conversations on the Civil War, 1864: Lincoln’s Re-election


Friday - February 21, 2014


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About This Show

John C. (Jack) Waugh, author of numerous books on the Civil War, including One Man Great Enough: Abraham Lincoln’s Road to the Civil War (Harcourt, 2007), joins  Dr. Edgar for a public conversation focusing on the re-election of Abraham Lincoln in 1864. As late as August of that year, Lincoln's prospects seemed grim. Most observers predicted that the failed commander of the Army of the Potomac, George McClellan, would win the presidency, and negotiate a peace with the Confederate States.

The presentation was recorded at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 21, and was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.


“A Brush with Deception” - Christian Thee, Artist


Friday - February 14, 2014


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About This Show

Joining Dr. Edgar today are Columbia artist Christian Thee and Mana Hewitt, artist and McMaster Gallery Director at USC's Department of Art, who will talk about Thee's art. Thee is recognized as one of the premiere practitioners of trompe l’oeil ("fool the eye") art. He is also a magician and professional stage designer.

Christian’s career in theater began in Columbia as a set designer for the Town Theater while he pursued his undergraduate education at the University of South Carolina. He earned a master’s degree in stage design from Columbia University, which allowed him to study with renowned scenic designer Lestor Polakov. He went on to create sets for more than 30 shows on and off Broadway.

 He has created trompe l'oeil murals in public spaces, in homes, and in the Kenan Chapel of Columbia's Trinity Cathedral. In 2004, he won the South Carolina “Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Award for Outstanding Individual Artist,” which is considered the highest honor for an individual artist in the state.


Conversations on the Civil War, 1864: Lee’s Miserables


Friday - February 07, 2014


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About This Show

Never did so large a proportion of the American population leave home for an extended period and produce such a detailed record of its experiences in the form of correspondence, diaries, and other papers as during the Civil War. Dr. Tracy Power’s book, Lee’s Miserables: Life in the Army of Northern Virginia from the Wilderness to Appomattox (UNC Press), offers a compelling social history of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during its final year, from May 1864 to April 1865—a history based on research in more than 1,200 wartime letters and diaries by more than 400 Confederate officers and enlisted men.

Dr. Power joined Dr. Edgar for a public conversation at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 14, 2014. The event was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.


More Than a Likeness: the Enduring Art of Mary Whyte


Friday - January 31, 2014


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About This Show

More Than a Likeness: The Enduring Art of Mary Whyte (USC Press, 2014) is the first comprehensive book on the life and work of one of today's most renowned watercolorists. From Whyte's earliest paintings in rural Ohio and Pennsylvania to the riveting portraits of her Southern neighbors, art historian Martha R. Severens provides us with an intimate look into the artist's private world.

With more than two hundred full-color images of Whyte's paintings and sketches as well as comparison works by masters such as Winslow Homer, Andrew Wyeth, and John Singer Sargent, Severens clearly illustrates how Whyte's art has been shaped and how the artist forged her own place in the world today.


A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa - Elaine Neil Orr


Friday - January 24, 2014


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About This Show

Elaine Neil Orr talks with Dr. Edgar about her first novel, A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa (Berkley Books, 2013). Orr was born in Nigeria to medical missionary parents and spent her growing-up years in the savannahs and rain forests of that country.  She left West Africa at age sixteen and attended college in Kentucky.  

Orr is an award-winning Professor of English at North Carolina State University and serves on the faculty of the brief-residency MFA in Writing Program at Spalding University.  She reads and lectures widely at universities and conferences from Atlanta to Austin to San Francisco to Vancouver to New York to Washington D.C., and in Nigeria.


Remembering Marian McPartland


Friday - January 17, 2014


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About This Show

Pianist, composer, and radio host Marian McPartland died in August of 2013 at the age of 95. Born in England, she became a fixture of the post World War II American jazz scene. In 1978, she became host of ETV Radio’s series Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz, which went on to become NPR’s longest running music program. Joining Walter Edgar to remember Ms. McPartland’s life and career are ETV Radio’s Shari Hutchinson and the Seattle Times’ Paul de Barros, author of Shall We Play That One Together? - The Life and Art of Jazz Piano Legend Marian McPartland (St. Martin’s Press, 2013).

Shari Hutchinson is General Manager of South Carolina ETV Radio and TV Programming. She is an award-winning producer of ETV’s national radio programming, including Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz, Song Travels with Michael Feinstein, Piano Jazz with John Weber, and Chamber Music from the Spoleto Festival USA.  Seattle Times music coordinator Paul de Barros has written about jazz and pop music for the paper since 1982 and is also the author of Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots of Jazz in Seattle.


Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s - John Shelton Reed


Friday - January 10, 2014


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About This Show

In the years following World War I, the New Orleans French Quarter attracted artists and writers with low rent, a faded charm, and colorful street life. By the 1920s Jackson Square became the center of a vibrant but short-lived bohemia. A young William Faulkner and his roommate William Spratling, an artist who taught at Tulane, were among the "artful and crafty ones of the French Quarter." In Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s (LSU Press, 2012) John Shelton Reed introduces Faulkner's circle of friends ranging from the distinguished Sherwood Anderson to a gender-bending Mardi Gras costume designer and brings to life the people and places of New Orleans in the jazz age.

Dr. John Shelton Reed is the William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor Emeritus of sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he was director of the Howard Odum Institute for Research in Social Science for twelve years and helped to found the university's Center for the Study of the American South and the quarterly Southern Cultures.


Benjamin Dunlap, President Emeritus of Wofford College


Friday - January 03, 2014


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 09/20/13) - In July of 2013, Dr. Benjamin Dunlap retired after 13 years as president of Wofford College. He was only the 10th chief executive in the 150-year history of the school. A Rhodes Scholar and Harvard PhD, Dr. Dunlap joins Walter Edgar to talk about his years working in higher education, at Wofford, the University of South Carolina, and at Harvard.

See Benjamin Dunlap in his "Cinematic Eye" days at SC ETV.


Jefferson’s Freeholders


Friday - December 27, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 06/28/13) - Dr. Christopher Curtis’ new book, Jefferson's Freeholders and the Politics of Ownership in the Old Dominion (Cambridge University Press, 2012), explores the political transformation of citizenship from an agrarian republic to a 19th century, slave-owning state.  Curtis, former chair of the Department of History and Sociology at Claflin University, talks with Dr. Edgar about the manner in which changing conceptions of property and changes in the legal system at once underpinned and reinforced changes in politics and the political order in one key southern state.


Protests, Prayers, & Progress: Greenville’s Civil Rights Movement


Friday - December 20, 2013


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About This Show

Walter Edgar’s Journal drops by the Upcountry History Museum - Furman University, in Greenville, SC, to talk with the Museum’s Dr. Courtney Tollison; Dr. Margaree Crosby, Professor Emeritus, Clemson University; and Greenville City Councilwoman Lillian Brock Flemming.  The discussion centers on an upcoming exhibition that commemorates the 50th anniversary of the desegregation of Greenville County schools. Protests, Prayers, & Progress, January 18 through June 5, 2014, details the people, events, and culture of Greenville’s Civil Rights Movement through oral histories, artifacts, images, and children’s activities.


The Weight of Mercy - Deb Richardson-Moore


Friday - December 13, 2013


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About This Show

Deb Richardson-Moore, a middle-aged suburban mom and journalist was inspired to become a pastor after writing a story exploring God’s call in our lives. Seven years ago, a recent graduate of Erskine Theological Seminary, she took a position as pastor of the non-denominational Triune Mercy Center, an inner-city mission to the homeless in Greenville, S.C. “What I found there absolutely flattened me,” she says. It also inspired her. Today, she and a dedicated staff continue to build a worshiping community that focuses on drug rehab, jobs and housing for the homeless.

Walter Edgar visits Pastor Richardson-Moore in her study at the Center to talk about the growth of its ministry and her journey, as well as her recent memoir, The Weight of Mercy: A Novice Pastor on the City Streets (Monarch Books, 2012)


A Grand Tour of Gardens - Anne Sinkler Whaley LeClercq


Friday - December 06, 2013


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About This Show

From Italy to Switzerland, Germany to Spain, and Philadelphia to New Orleans, Anne Sinkler Whaley LeClercq describes the beauty of different historic gardens in her collection of essays, A Grand Tour of Gardens: Traveling in Beauty through Western Europe and the United States (USC Press, 2012). LeClercq shares with Dr. Edgar stories of her visits to historic gardens around the world.


Art Expert Miller Gaffney; Newt Gingrich


Friday - November 29, 2013


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About This Show

This week Walter Edgar talks with Miller Gaffney—art appraiser and consultant. Trained at Sotheby’s, and a veteran of the PBS television programs Market Warriors and Antiques Roadshow, this Greenville native is in demand around the world as an advisor, appraiser, and broker of fine art.

Later in the program: a visit with a former history professor turned politician, Newt Gingrich, who stopped by our studios a while back, on his way to visit the Revolutionary War battlefield at Cowpens.


Reimagining Greenville - Knox White


Friday - November 22, 2013


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About This Show

Greenville's downtown is widely recognized as one of the best in America. In Reimagining Greenville: Building the Best Downtown in America (The History Press, 2013), authors John Boyanoski and Mayor Knox White tell the story of the careful, deliberate efforts by city and community leaders who banded together to build something special from a decaying city center. Greenville Mayor Knox White invited Walter Edgar's Journal to City Hall to talk about the reimagining of downtown.


The Storied South


Friday - November 15, 2013


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About This Show

The Storied South - Voices of Writers and Artists (UNC Press, 2013) features the voices of twenty-six of the most luminous artists and thinkers in the American cultural firmament, from Eudora Welty, Pete Seeger, and Alice Walker to William Eggleston, Bobby Rush, and C. Vann Woodward. Masterfully drawn from one-on-one interviews conducted by renowned folklorist William Ferris over the past forty years, the book reveals how storytelling is viscerally tied to southern identity and how the work of these southern or southern-inspired creators has shaped the way Americans think and talk about the South.

Dr. Ferris, the Joel R. Williamson Eminent Professor of History and senior associate director of the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, joins Dr. Edgar to talk about the book.


The Civil Rights Movement, 1963 - A Pivotal Year


Friday - November 08, 2013


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About This Show

In the Civil Rights movement, 1963 was a pivotal year, now remembered for the violent resistance to desegregation in Alabama and Mississippi, and for the momentous March on Washington. It was also a year of great change in South Carolina, with a number of important Civil Rights initiatives and achievements.

Joining Dr. Edgar, to look back at the events of 1963, are Dr. Bobby Donaldson of the University of South Carolina and Dr. Jon Hale of the College of Charleston.


Spreading the Word: William Gilmore Simms


Friday - November 01, 2013


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About This Show

Among mid-19th-century American romancers (or writers of prose epics), only New Yorker James Fenimore Cooper was as successful as South Carolina author William Gilmore Simms. In those same years, Simms was the South's most influential editor of cultural journals. He also was the region's most prolific cultural journalist and poet, publishing an average of a book review and a poem per week for forty-five years.

 As curator of the Simms Initiatives of the University of South Carolina Libraries, Dr. Todd Hagstette guides a project with the ambitious goals of producing a comprehensive bibliographic database and as well as a complete digital edition of the significant writings of Simms. He tells Dr. Edgar about the Initiative, and they talk about some of their favorite works by Simms.

Catch the Simms Initiatives' readings of Grayling; or, “Murder Will Out” on YouTube


Greenville’s Year of Altruism


Friday - October 25, 2013


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About This Show

While discussing plans for the 75th anniversary observance of Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass— a day which saw the beginning of Nazi killing and imprisonment of Jews in Germany and Austria— Greenville community leaders were moved by the stories of thousands of "Righteous Gentiles" who had risked their lives to rescue, conceal and protect victimized Jews. The planners realized that the story of altruism - compassion, mercy, self-sacrifice, idealism - is a universal story, not one of a particular place, time, or people. From this realization came Greenville’s Year of Altruism, a citywide program promoting tolerance and understanding. Dr. Edgar travels to the Upcountry History Museum to talk with Rabbi Marc Wilson and historian Courtney Tollison about it.


Colour of Music - Black Classical Musicians Festival


Friday - October 18, 2013


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About This Show

In recognition of black classical composers, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra Spiritual Ensemble will be hosting the Colour of Music Festival, October 23 – 27, 2013, featuring black musicians, vocalists, and orchestra leaders. Performances will include piano, organ, and voice recitals, chamber ensembles and orchestral performances. The festival’s founder and director, Lee Pringle, joins Dr. Edgar to talk about it and about the contributions of black artists and composers to the world of classical music.


South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times (encore)


Sunday - October 13, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 03/22/13) - Dr. Marjorie Julian Spruill and Dr. Valinda W. Littlefield, of the Department of History at USC, along with Dr. Joan Marie Johnson, lecturer at Northeastern Illinois University, are co-editors of the three-volume series of books South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times. Spruill and Littlefield join Dr. Edgar to talk about the extraordinary women of our state, from Colonial times to the present.


Time to Make Your Pledge to Support Walter Edgar’s Journal


Friday - October 11, 2013


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About This Show

To mark ETV Radio’s Fall 2013 On-Air Membership Drive, Walter Edgar’s Journal will sample some of our favorite interviews from the past year, while giving you a chance to support the program with a pledge.


Preserving Our History for Our Future


Friday - October 04, 2013


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About This Show

South Carolina has a rich history. As our state grows and prospers in the 21st century, how can we preserve that history, as it is reflected in the built environment and in historical places of importance? Two people who are helping to answer that question join Dr. Edgar on today's Journal. Michael Bedenbaugh is the Executive Director of the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation, which works to re-purpose and conserve historic buildings across the state; and Michael Allen is a Community Partnership Specialist for the National Park Service, who has been active in helping establish the Gullah Geechee Heritage Corridor.


Seeking - Poetry and Prose Inspired by the Art of Jonathan Green


Friday - September 27, 2013


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About This Show

Renowned South Carolina artist Jonathan Green's work has inspired a wide range of artists around the world. In Seeking - Poetry and Prose Inspired by the Art of Jonathan Green (USC Press, 2013), co-editors Kwame Dawes and Marjory Wentworth gather some of their responses, in works of poetry, prose, and memoir.

Seeking's evocative power lies in the intimacy of this dialogue, which speaks to the shared sense of landscape and culture that Green stirs in these writers, ranging from close friends and fellow artists from his home state of South Carolina to nationally established authors who regard Green's work as an important cultural institution. Jonathan Green, Kwame Dawes, and Marjory Wentworth talk with Dr. Edgar about these "responses," and the art that provoked them.


Benjamin Dunlap, President Emeritus of Wofford College


Friday - September 20, 2013


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About This Show

In July of 2013, Dr. Benjamin Dunlap retired after 13 years as president of Wofford College. He was only the 10th chief executive in the 150-year history of the school. A Rhodes Scholar and Harvard PhD, Dr. Dunlap joins Walter Edgar to talk about his years working in higher education, at Wofford, the University of South Carolina, and at Harvard.

See Benjamin Dunlap in his "Cinematic Eye" days at SC ETV.


Moving History: The Pines Plantation Slave Cabin


Friday - September 13, 2013


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About This Show

In May of 2013, a one-story, rectangular, weatherboard-clad, 19th-century slave cabin was dismantled at the Point of Pines Plantation on Edisto Island, SC, and transferred to the collection of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, in Washington, DC. The reconstructed cabin will be on view in the “Slavery and Freedom” exhibition when the museum opens in 2015.

Nancy Bercaw, NMAAHC curator; Gretchen Smith, director of the Edisto Island Historical Preservation Society; and Mary N. Elliott, project historian for the NMAAHC, will join Dr. Edgar to talk about the cabin, which Bercaw calls “one of the jewels of the museum.”

(Photo courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture)


Cassandra King: Moonrise


Friday - September 06, 2013


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About This Show

South Carolina novelist Cassandra King’s new book, Moonrise (Maiden Lane Press, 2013), is inspired by Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier’s classic, gothic romance. Set in the mountains of western North Carolina, Moonrise tells the story of a woman living in the shadow of her predecessor, a beautiful and much-beloved woman whose tragic death shattered the lives of her loved ones.


Selected Letters of William Styron - Blake Gilpin


Friday - August 30, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 04/05/13) - Dr. R. Blakeslee “Blake” Gilpin, Associate Professor of History at USC, Columbia, returns to the Journal to talk with Dr. Edgar about the life and work of Virginia author, William Styron. With Rose Styron, Gilpin edited the correspondence of Styron, Selected Letters of William Styron, (Random House, December 2012).  

Collecting, transcribing, and notating Styron's letters has provided the foundation for two original projects related to the author and his work. Gilpin is currently writing a new biography of Styron as well as completing a manuscript about Nat Turner, William Styron, and the longevity of slavery's hold on America's racial imagination.


Man and Moment: Ted Bell and the Ridge


Friday - August 23, 2013


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About This Show

In April of 2013, an Army veteran from South Carolina returned to Okinawa, Japan, for the first time since he fought there in World War II. Retired Col. Ted Bell, 93, went back to the island after more than 67 years, this time with a film crew for South Carolina ETV, shooting part of the upcoming documentary, Man and Moment: Ted Bell and the Ridge. 

Ted Bell joins Walter Edgar, filmmaker Wade Sellers, and The State newspaper journalist and documentary producer Jeff Wilkinson to talk about his visit to Okinawa, and about the brutal three-day battle on Ishimmi Ridge. Man and Moment: Ted Bell and the Ridge will air on South Carolina ETV on Thursday, August 29, 2013.


Sissieretta Jones: Pioneering African American Diva


Friday - August 16, 2013


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About This Show

Sissieretta Jones, “The Greatest Singer of Her Race,” 1868-1933 (USC Press, 2012), recounts the life of  Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones, a classically trained soprano who was also called the “Black Patti,” a nickname that likened her to the famous white, European opera star Adelina Patti. Jones sang before four U.S. presidents and for several prominent European leaders. She performed in famous venues such as Carnegie Hall, London’s Covent Garden, and Madison Square Garden, as well as in hundreds of theaters and opera houses throughout the United States and Canada. Yet, this remarkable singer’s accomplishments have been largely overlooked. 

South Carolina author Maureen Lee explores the obstacles and limitations Jones faced because of her race, as well as the opportunities she seized, and chronicles the development of black entertainment during the late nineteenth, and early twentieth, centuries.

Maureen Jones' web site: www.sissierettajones.com.


The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen


Friday - August 09, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 03/01/13) - The Lee Brothers, Matt and Ted, were the first young food writers to bring a refreshingly real-life, ravenous voice to the rarefied Southern food coverage in The New York Times. But it was their first cookbook that put them on the map as writers to be reckoned with. The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook was a hit and won several awards in 2007, including a James Beard Awards for “Cookbook of the Year.” Two years later the duo published another award-winning cookbook, Simple, Fresh, Southern.

In the decade since they began writing, the entire world has changed for Southern food, meaning the Lees can speak to the state of Southern food today with the perspective of knowing where it's been, and where it's all going. With their latest book, The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen, they have moved a deeper discussion of Southern food into the mainstream.

Related content:


Southern Bound - John S. Sledge


Friday - August 02, 2013


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About This Show

Southern Bound - A Gulf Coast Journalist on Books, Writers, and Literary Pilgrimages of the Heart represents a running conversation on books, writers, and literary travel written by John S. Sledge for the Mobile Press-Register Books page from 1995 to 2011.

While some of the essays are relatively straightforward book reviews, others present meditative and deeply personal perspectives on the author's literary experiences such as serving on the jury in the stage version of To Kill a Mockingbird; rambling through funky New Orleans bookshops; rereading Treasure Island on the shores of Mobile Bay; and remembering a beloved father's favorite books. Engaging and spirited, Southern Bound represents the critical art at its most accessible and will prove entertaining fare for anyone who loves the written word.


Found in Translation: the Art of Steven Naifeh


Friday - July 26, 2013


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About This Show

Steven Naifeh is an artist, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and an Internet entrepreneur. The Columbia Museum of Art has organized the first retrospective museum exhibition of Naifeh’s paintings and sculpture, entitled Found in Translation: The Art of Steven Naifeh. The 26 large-scale works of modern art reflect Naifeh’s personal taste, preferences and attitudes about geometric which were influenced by his childhood in the Middle East.

Dr. Edgar talks with Naifeh and with Will South, Chief Curator at the CMA, about the show, and the artist/writer’s career.


Conversations on the Civil War - 1863: The Fight for Charleston


Friday - July 19, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 04/26/13) - In the summer of 1863 three major campaigns occurred that affected the outcome of the Civil War. Two of three, Gettysburg and Vicksburg were dramatic turning points, while a third campaign directed against Charleston, South Carolina, proved instrumental for the Civil War but also future battles. The campaign introduced a new era of engineering and gunnery; it was a testing ground for African American troops and had a tremendous impact on life in Charleston and the Palmetto State.

Dr. Stephen R. Wise, curator of the Parris Island Museum of Marine Corps History, is author of Lifeline of the Confederacy: Blockade Running during the Civil War (USC Press) and Gate of Hell: Campaign for Charleston Harbor, 1863 (USC Press). He talks with Dr. Edgar about the Battle for Charleston, and about blockade runners, in a presentation that is part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1863,” held at USC, Columbia, in January and February, 2013. The series was sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.


The Summer Girls - Mary Alice Monroe


Friday - July 12, 2013


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About This Show

In her new trilogy, The Summer Girls (Gallery Books, 2012), set on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, New York Times bestselling author Mary Alice Monroe captures the complex relationships between three half sisters scattered across the country—and a grandmother determined to help them rediscover their family bonds. She joins Dr. Edgar to talk about the book.


Conversations on the Civil War, 1863: Gettysburg


Friday - July 05, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 03/15/13) - July 2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War battle of Gettysburg. Dr. Mark Smith, Carolina Distinguished Professor of History at USC, joins Dr. Edgar for one of a series of public conversations, “Conversations on the Civil War – 1863,” sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences at USC. Smith and Edgar explore how people, both soldiers and civilians, might have experienced the bloodiest battle of the Civil War: Gettysburg.

Previously on Walter Edgar's Journal:


Jefferson’s Freeholders


Friday - June 28, 2013


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About This Show

Dr. Christopher Curtis’ new book, Jefferson's Freeholders and the Politics of Ownership in the Old Dominion (Cambridge University Press, 2012), explores the political transformation of citizenship from an agrarian republic to a 19th century, slave-owning state. Curtis, Chair of the Department of History and Sociology at Claflin University, talks with Dr. Edgar about the manner in which changing conceptions of property and changes in the legal system at once underpinned and reinforced changes in politics and the political order in one key southern state.


USC Lancaster: Native American Studies Center


Friday - June 21, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 01/18/13) - USC Lancaster's new Native American Studies Center is opened in October, the only Native American Studies Program in the USC system.  The center features 6,000 sq feet of gallery space, an oral history recording studio, a Catawba language lab, an archive with photos, documents and recordings of S.C. tribes, and an archaeology lab. It houses the world's largest collection of Catawba pottery.

Dr. Stephen Criswell, the director of the Center, and Dr. Chris Judge, assistant director, join Dr. Edgar to talk about it.


City Year - 20 Years of Service in South Carolina


Friday - June 14, 2013


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About This Show

In 1992, while a student at Harvard Law, the former student body president of the University of South Carolina, Marie-Louise Ramsdale, attended an event called Serve-a-thon for City Year. Inspired by City Year and the 10,000 people performing transformational service, she returned that night to the computer lab at Harvard and wrote a two-page proposal to bring the program to Columbia, S.C. Inspired by her passion and determination, the co-founders, Alan Khazei and Michael Brown, founded City Year Columbia in the summer of 1993. 

Ramsdale joins City Year Columbia 2013 corps member Emily Williams, and the Honorable Richard W. Riley, former S.C. Governor and former Secretary of Education, to talk with Walter Edgar about 20 years of service in the Midlands by City Year Columbia. “Give a year. Change the World.”


Paul Zimmerman: Everyday Roses


Friday - June 07, 2013


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About This Show

Paul Zimmerman is dedicated to teaching that “Roses are plants, too.” It’s a philosophy that guides his company, Paul Zimmerman Roses, his work as director of the Biltmore® International Rose Trials, and is at the heart of his new book, Everyday Roses – How To Grow Knockout and Other Easy-Care Garden Roses  (Taunton Press, 2013). He joins Dr. Edgar to talk about his work, the new book, and to help dispel the myths about what it takes to grow great roses.


Upstate Forever


Friday - May 31, 2013


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About This Show

Upstate Forever is a non-profit organization that envisions an "environmentally and economically prosperous region, with a high quality of life for all."  Executive Director Brad Wyche talks with Dr. Edgar about how the group works to promote sensible growth while protecting the special places in the ten counties of Upstate South Carolina.


Man and Moment: T. Moffatt Burriss and the Crossing


Friday - May 24, 2013


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 06/29/12) - Anderson native T. Moffatt Burris is a WWII veteran and concentration camp liberator who also participated in the invasions of Sicily and Italy. During Operation Market Garden in Holland, he led the amphibious assault across the Waal River made famous in the movie, A Bridge Too Far. Burriss is the subject of the upcoming ETV special Man and Moment: T. Moffatt Burriss and the Crossing. He joins Dr. Edgar, State newspaper reporter Jeff Wilkinson, and documentary producer Lee Ann Kornegay, to talk about the war and about making the film.


Conversations on the Civil War - 1863: Mary Chesnut’s Civil War


Friday - May 17, 2013


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About This Show

Julia Stern, professor of English and American Studies at Northwestern University and author of Mary Chesnut's Civil War Epic, will "unpack the way in which at levels domestic, historical and epic, Chesnut's literary genius uniquely illuminated the greatest conflict of the American 19th century." Her conversation with Dr. Edgar was recorded before an audience at the University of South Carolina, part of the series Conversations on the Civil War, 1863, sponsored by USC's College of Arts and Sciences, and by USC's Office of the President.


Ellen Schlaefer - For the Love of Opera


Friday - May 10, 2013


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About This Show

Growing up in Columbia, Ellen Douglas Schlaefer never dreamed that she would one day direct operatic productions for some of the great opera companies around the world. But, she has. And now she brings her energy and talent to Opera at USC, one of only a handful of colleges and universities in the country that offer special training and practice for aspiring opera stage directors. Schlaefer is also the creator of the non-profit FBN Productions, which brings specially commissioned operas for children into schools around the southeast.


Romantic Spirits: Nineteenth Century Paintings of the South from the Johnson Collection


Friday - May 03, 2013


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About This Show

Romantic Spirits: Nineteenth Century Paintings of the South from the Johnson Collection (Cane Ridge/USC Press, 2013) is a lavishly illustrated volume exploring romanticism in iconic Southern masterworks. Many of the artists under consideration in the book created works of art that have achieved iconic status in the annals of painting in the South, including William Dickinson Washington, William Thompson Russell Smith, Gustave Henry Mosler, Thomas Addison Richards, Joseph Rusling Meeker, Robert Walter Weir, and Thomas Sully.

In this study of thirty-two artists represented in the Johnson Collection, noted art historian Estill Curtis Pennington delineates the historical, social, and cultural forces that profoundly influenced their aesthetic sensibilities. Walter’s guests, Martha Severens, art historian and curator; and collector Susu Johnson, talk with him about the art of the era and about the Johnson Collection, as well as the book and the Romantic Spirits exhibition at the Morris Museum in Augusta, Georgia.


Conversations on the Civil War - 1863: Vicksburg


Friday - April 19, 2013


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About This Show

Winston Groom, novelist and author of Forrest Gump, has also written a number of well received histories, including Vicksburg, 1863. This narrative history of the Civil War’s most strategically important campaign describes the bloody two-year grind that started when Ulysses S. Grant began taking a series of Confederate strongholds in 1861, climaxing with the siege of Vicksburg two years later. For Grant and the Union it was a crucial success that captured the Mississippi River, divided the South in half, and set the stage for eventual victory.

Groom talks with Dr. Edgar about the siege of Vicksburg in a presentation that is part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1863,” held at USC, Columbia, in January and February, 2013. The series was sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.


What is real Southern cooking?


Sunday - April 14, 2013


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About This Show

Sunday at 4:00 on ETV Radio's News Stations
(Originally broadcast 07/09/10) - Today’s edition of The Journal is an encore of our 2010 “preview” of a Take on the South episode which aired on ETV in July. The question before the debaters that July, “What is real Southern cooking?” The Lee Brothers and John T. Edge are our guests.

Related content:

Watch What is Real Southern Cooking? on PBS. See more from wrlk.


Good Southern Food…and a Chance to Support the Journal


Friday - April 12, 2013


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About This Show

Friday we will be live in the ETV Radio studios, offering you a tasty show about Southern cooking! We'll feature excerpts from past episodes of Walter Edgar's Journal featuring Nathalie Dupree, the Lee Brothers, and John Martin Taylor.  You will get the chance to pledge your financial support to the Journal, and receive one of the latest books by these champions of Southern Cuisine as our thank-you gift.
Join us Friday, April 12, at noon, to make your pledge for Walter Edgar's Journal at 1-800-256-8535! (This program will not be podcast.)

Sunday at 4:00 on ETV Radio's News Stations, listen for a Journal encore of an episode that tackled the question, "What is Real Southern Cooking?" The Lee Brothers and John T. Edge are our guests.
Find the podcast here. 



Blake Gilpin: Selected Letters of William Styron


Friday - April 05, 2013


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About This Show

Dr. R. Blakeslee "Blake" Gilpin, Associate Professor of History at USC, Columbia, returns to the Journal to talk with Dr. Edgar about the life and work of Virginia author, William Styron. With Rose Styron, Gilpin edited the correspondence of Styron, Selected Letters of William Styron (Random House, December 2012).

Collecting, transcribing, and notating Styron's letters has provided the foundation for two original projects related to the author and his work. Gilpin is currently writing a new biography of Styron as well as completing a manuscript about Nat Turner, William Styron, and the longevity of slavery's hold on America's racial imagination.


Upstate to Lowcountry: Art and History


Friday - March 29, 2013


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About This Show

In this episode of Walter Edgar's Journal we travel from the Upstate to the Lowcountry.

Somehow, over the course of a successful, 40-year career as an Upstate attorney, Tim Greaves found time to pursue his dream of becoming an artist. Greaves began art studies in 1994, working with a number of nationally-known artists. His paintings, include portraits, landscapes of all types, cityscapes, beach and hunting scenes, though, agruably his favorite work is to render the people and land of South Carolina's Lowcoutnry. Greaves, now retired from the practice of law, joins Dr. Edgar to talk about making his art a second career.

Then, Dr. Edgar talks with Alan Stello, Director of The Powder Magazine, in Charleston, S.C. The magazine is the oldest public building in the Carolinas, celebrating its three-hundredth birthday in 2013!


South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times


Friday - March 22, 2013


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About This Show

Dr. Marjorie Julian Spruill and Dr. Valinda W. Littlefield, of the Department of History at USC, along with Dr. Joan Marie Johnson, lecturer at Northeastern Illinois University, are co-editors of the three-volume series of books South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times. Spruill and Littlefield join Dr. Edgar to talk about the extraordinary women of our state, from Colonial times to the present.


Conversations on the Civil War - 1863: Gettysburg


Friday - March 15, 2013


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About This Show

Dr. Mark Smith, Carolina Distinguished Professor of History at USC, joins Dr. Edgar for the second of a series of public conversations, “Conversations on the Civil War – 1863,” and sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences. Smith and Edgar explore how people, both soldiers and civilians, might have experienced the bloodiest battle of the Civil War: Gettysburg.


Botanica Caroliniana: Patrick McMillan and Amy Blackwell


Friday - March 08, 2013


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About This Show

Botanica Caroliniana is an inter-institutional, inter-disciplinary collaborative project in research, teaching, and publication, that focuses on the botany of the Carolinas from their earliest exploration by Europeans to living plants under curation and in the wild today. Two of the principal researchers in the project, Patrick McMillan, Director of the South Carolina Botanical Garden at Clemson University; and Amy Hackney Blackwell, researcher in Plant and Environmental Science at Clemson University, join Dr. Edgar to talk about the first steps in creating one part of the project, an on-line digital library of specimens in the herbarium of 18th century naturalist and illustrator, Mark Catesby.


Lee Brothers’ Charleston Kitchen


Friday - March 01, 2013


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About This Show

The Lee Brothers, Matt and Ted, were the first young food writers to bring a refreshingly real-life, ravenous voice to the rarefied Southern food coverage in The New York Times. But it was their first cookbook that put them on the map as writers to be reckoned with. The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook was a hit and won several awards in 2007, including a James Beard Awards, for  “Cookbook of the Year.” Two years later the duo published another award-winning cookbook, Simple, Fresh, Southern.

In the decade since they began writing, the entire world has changed for Southern food, meaning the Lees can speak to the state of Southern food today with the perspective of knowing where it's been, and where it's all going. In 2012 they established Tradd Street Associates in their hometown of Charleston, a consulting firm to help the hospitality industry with food strategy and media affairs. With their forthcoming book, The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen, they're moving a deeper discussion of Southern food into the mainstream.


Baptized in Sweet Tea: Ken Burger


Friday - February 22, 2013


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About This Show

Ken Burger spent almost 40 years writing for two South Carolina newspapers, during a career that included stints covering sports, business, politics and life in the Palmetto State.

 Burger’s new book, Baptized in Sweet Tea, is a collection of columns he has written for the Charleston Post & Courier. As the title hints, the common thread running through the collection is Burger’s southern-ness… and, more specifically, his identity as a born-and-bred South Carolinian. While he may have been baptized in sweet tea, his essays are steeped in a bittersweet nostalgia for a way of life that’s passing into memory… and a reverence for those timeless qualities that abide.


Conversations on the Civil War - 1863: Emancipation


Friday - February 15, 2013


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About This Show

This program offers the first of a series of public conversations at USC, Columbia, Conversations on the Civil War - 1863. The series features Dr. Edgar in conversation with scholars and authors, renowned for their works on the American Civil War. Our first guest, Dr. Thavolia Glymph, of Duke University, talks with him about the importance of the Emancipation Proclamation.


The Unpainted South


Friday - February 08, 2013


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About This Show

The book The Unpainted South: Carolina’s Vanishing World features the photographs of Selden B. Hill and the songs and poems of William P. Baldwin, both of McClellanville, S.C. A tribute to the faded glory of South Carolina’s rural past, it features haunting images of abandoned farmhouses, leaning tobacco barns, and boarded up redbrick towns, combined with powerful verse.

Baldwin and Hill talk with Dr. Edgar about the book, their exhibit at Patriot Hall’s Gallery 35 in Sumter, and their latest book, These Our Offerings, which was created in conjunction with photographers Sharon Cumbee and Robert Epps.


The Education of Harvey Gantt


Friday - February 01, 2013


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About This Show

On January 28, 1963 a young black man named Harvey Gantt enrolled at Clemson College, becoming the first African American accepted to a white school in South Carolina. A new ETV documentary, The Education of Harvey Gantt, chronicles this pivotal story of desegregation in the South. The program, which airs February 7 at 8:00 p.m. on ETV, features interviews with Mr. Gantt, distinguished scholars and civil rights veterans, archival footage and carefully designed reenactments.

Joining Dr. Edgar to talk about the events of January 1963 are Dr. Vernon Burton, Professor of History at Clemson University; Dr. Bobby Donaldson, Associate Professor of History and African American Studies, at USC; and Mr. Harvey Gantt.

(Photo: Cecil Williams)


The Search Committee: Tim Owens


Friday - January 25, 2013


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About This Show

In his novel, The Search Committee, Tim Owens presents an affectionate portrait of the people and places of eastern North Carolina.  When a small North Carolina Presbyterian church east of  I-95 needs a new pastor, the church does what churches do: they appoint a search committee. When this mismatched team of seven first hits the road in an Econoline church van, they don't agree on much other than the stops at Hardees for coffee and a biscuit. But they stick to the call, trying to slip undetected into worship services across the Southeast--all in hopes of stealing a preacher for their congregation.


Nathalie Dupree: Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking


Friday - January 11, 2013


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About This Show

Nathalie Dupree, co-author of the new book, Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking, joins Dr. Edgar in a program recorded before a live audience. Dupree is the author of eleven cookbooks about the American South, entertaining, and basic cooking. She has hosted over 300 television shows on the Food Network, The Learning Channel and PBS. She has been a spokesperson for Wild American Shrimp, The Catfish Institute and many other organizations. She currently writes for The Post and Courier in Charleston, S.C., as well as Charleston Magazine and other publications.


The South in the 21st Century


Friday - January 04, 2013


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About This Show

Dr. Edgar is joined by John Shelton Reed, Jim Cobb, and Peter Applebome, three noted writers and observers of Southern culture and history, for a discussion of the “necessary South”—a region with an identity that began to be defined, in Colonial America, primarily by New Englanders. Who defines the South now? And how has its evolving identity changed the rest of the country over time? What will “The South” mean in the 21st century?

Jim C. Cobb, the B. Phinizy Spalding Distinguished Professor in the History of the American South at the University of Georgia, is widely recognized as one of the foremost scholars of Southern history and culture. 

Peter Applebome is Deputy Metropolitan Editor for The New York Times, its former Southern Bureau chief, and is the author of Dixie Rising: How the South is Shaping American Values, Politics and Culture.

John Shelton Reed is the William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor Emeritus of sociology at the University of NC where he helped to found the Center for the Study of the American South and was a founding co-editor of the quarterly Southern Cultures. He is also author or editor of eighteen books, most dealing with the contemporary American South.


John Martin Taylor: Hoppin’ John’s Lowcountry Cooking


Friday - December 28, 2012


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About This Show

At oyster roasts and fancy cotillions, in fish camps and cutting-edge restaurants, the people of South Carolina gather to enjoy one of America's most distinctive cuisines--the delicious, inventive fare of the Lowcountry. In the 25th anniversary edition of his classic, Hoppin' John's Lowcountry Cooking, John Martin Taylor offers 250 authentic and updated recipes for regional favorites, including shrimp and grits, she-crab soup, pickled watermelon rinds, and Frogmore stew. Taylor, who grew up casting shrimp nets in Lowcountry marshes, adds his personal experiences in bringing these dishes to the table and leads readers on a veritable treasure hunt throughout the region, offering a taste of an extraordinary way of life.


Pam Stone: I Love Me a Turkey Butt Samich


Friday - December 21, 2012


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About This Show

Former actress and comedienne Pam Stone talks with Dr. Edgar about her new book, I Love Me a Turkey Butt Samwich: Finding a Farm Life after Hollywood, a collection of readers’ favorites from Pam’s syndicated column, "I'm Just Saying."

Stone and her husband, Paul Zimmerman, owner of Ashdown Roses in Gowensville, moved in 1993 to Gowensville where she followed her passion and became a horse riding instructor. She previously toured as a stand-up comic, and was named in 1993 the Funniest Female Stand-Up Comic. She also played the role of Judy Watkins on the television series, "Coach," from 1989 to 1997.


Willard Hirsch: Charleston Sculptor


Friday - December 14, 2012


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About This Show

Dr. Edgar and his guests look at the life and work of Charleston sculptor Willard Hirsch. An exhibition at the Gibbes Museum in Charleston, Willard Hirsch: Charleston Sculptor, examines the body of work Hirsch developed over the course of his fifty-year career. Taking part in the conversation are Sara Arnold, Curator of Collections at the Gibbes Museum, Jane Hirsch; Martha Severens, former Chief Curator at the Greenville County Museum of Art; and Jane Hirsch, Willard Hirsch’s daughter and editor of the recent book Art Is a Powerful Language: Willard Hirsch--The Man, The Artist.

 Willard Hirsch: Charleston Sculptor will be on display at the Gibbes Museum through December 30. It next will be on display in the Rainey Sculpture Pavilion in Brookgreen Gardens, January 26 through April 21, 2013.


Michael Morris: Man in the Blue Moon


Friday - December 07, 2012


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About This Show

Author Michael Morris talks with Dr. Edgar about his new novel Man in the Blue Moon.  Pat Conroy writes, “Man in the Blue Moon is a beautifully wrought portrayal of small town southern life where poverty, tragedy and human love engage in a ritualistic dance.”


Dr. Harvey Jackson: The Rise and Decline of the Redneck Riviera


Friday - November 30, 2012


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About This Show

In his book, The Rise and Decline of the Redneck Riviera, Dr. Harvey H. Jackson III traces the development of the Florida-Alabama coast as a tourist destination from the late 1920s and early 1930s, when it was sparsely populated with "small fishing villages," through to the tragic and devastating BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010.

Jackson focuses on the stretch of coast from Mobile Bay and Gulf Shores, Alabama, east to Panama City, Florida—an area known as the "Redneck Riviera." Jackson explores the rise of this area as a vacation destination for the lower South's middle- and working-class families following World War II, the building boom of the 1950s and 1960s, the emergence of the Spring Break "season, and the severe hurricane destruction of the many small motels, cafes, bars, and early cottages that gave the small beach towns their essential character. 

Jackson traces the tensions surrounding the gentrification of the late 1980s and 1990s and the collapse of the housing market in 2008. While his major focus is on the social, cultural, and economic development, he also documents the environmental and financial impacts of natural disasters and the politics of beach access and dune and sea turtle protection.


Dr. Blake Gilpin: Hopping Freight Trains


Friday - November 23, 2012


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 08/24/12) -On his way to a degree at Yale University, Blake Gilpin, chose a unique approach in tackling his master’s thesis. Riding the rails, illegally catching rides by hopping onto freight trains, much as the hobos of the early 20th century had done, he journeyed hundreds of miles, living the hobo life. He also kept a diary that eventually became his thesis. Now an assistant professor of history at USC in Columbia, he joins Dr. Edgar to recount some of his journeys and what he learned while “hopping freights.”


Rev. Dr. Ken Walden, Claflin Univeristy


Friday - November 16, 2012


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About This Show

Dr. Ken J. Walden is University Chaplain at Claflin University, in Orangeburg, South Carolina. Claflin University was founded in 1869 and is the oldest historically black college or university in the state of South Carolina. Dr. Walden comes to Claflin after spending a number of years serving as a United Methodist Pastor in the North Carolina Annual Conference, the Detroit Annual Conference, and the California Pacific Annual Conference

He talks with Dr. Edgar about his journey as a pastor from South Carolina to North Carolina, Detroit, California, and back.


Greg Johnsman: Geechee Boy Market and Mill


Friday - November 09, 2012


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About This Show

When Greg Johnsman and his wife Betsy moved from the Upstate in 2003 to an Edisto Island farm that had been in her family for generations, they began growing fruits and vegetables which the sold from their own roadside stand. It was 2007, though, when Greg took a big step toward fulfilling a dream to mill and sell his own freshly ground grits: he bought and restored a 1945 grist mill that had been stored in a barn for 40 years.

Now, Geechee Boy Market and Mill mills about 2,000 pounds of grits and cornmeal each week, much of which it sells locally. Greg also supplies four James Beard Award-winning restaurants in Charleston and ships his products around the country. He joins Dr. Edgar to talk about how he first learned to mill corn, and about realizing the dream of milling and selling his own products.


South Carolinians in World War II: A World War


Friday - November 02, 2012


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About This Show

The Emmy-nominated documentary television series (produced in partnership by ETV and The State newspaper), South Carolinians in World War II, returns to ETV November 8th with its latest episode, A World War.  Joining Dr. Edgar to talk about this episode, and the war, are John Rainey, co-creator of the series; Wade Sellers, series director; and The State's Jeff Wilkinson, series producer.

Related links:
South Carolinians in World War II
Jeff Wilkinson
E-mail contact form for Walter Edgar's Journal


James Cobb: The South and America since WWII


Friday - October 26, 2012


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About This Show

In his new book, The South and America since WWII, James C. Cobb provides the first truly comprehensive history of the South since World War II, brilliantly capturing an era of dramatic change, both in the South and in its relationship with the rest of the nation.

Here is a panoramic narrative that flows seamlessly from the Dixiecrats to the "southern strategy," to the South's domination of today's GOP, and from the national ascendance of southern culture and music, to a globalized Dixie's allure for foreign factories and a flood of immigrants, to the roles of women and an increasingly visible gay population in contemporary southern life.


A Plan to “Enlighten and Empower Gullah Geechee People to Sustain the Culture”


Friday - October 19, 2012


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About This Show

The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission’s Management Plan, Enlighten and Empower Gullah Geechee People to Sustain the Culture, is completed and available for public review and comment. Ron Daise, Chair of the Commission; Michael Allen, Community Partnership Specialist, U.S. Park Service, join Dr. Edgar to talk about the plan, which represents an almost four-year planning effort on the part of the Commission, with input from the public, stakeholders, prospective partners, and Gullah Geechee community and grassroots organizations.

For more information, visit:


Best of WEJ Pledge Special


Friday - October 12, 2012


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About This Show

This week’s program offers highlights from past shows and an opportunity for you to support Walter Edgar’s Journal with your pledge.

This program will not be podcast.


Jon Buchan: Code of the Forest


Friday - October 05, 2012


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About This Show

Jon Buchan, a First Amendment attorney and former newspaper political reporter, drew on his expert knowledge to produce Code of The Forest, a legal drama that, in the words of New York Times best-selling author Ron Rash, is “nearly impossible to put down.” An authoritative voice with an insider’s understanding of Southern politics, Buchan takes readers into the courtrooms, newsrooms and political backrooms of the South Carolina Lowcountry in this tale of corruption and quest for human connection.


The Richard W. Riley Institute of Government, Politics, and Public Leadership


Friday - September 28, 2012


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About This Show

The Richard W. Riley Institute of Government, Politics, and Public Leadership, named for former Governor of South Carolina and United States Secretary of Education Richard Riley, is a multi-faceted, non-partisan institute affiliated with the Department of Political Science at Furman University. The Institute is unique in the United States in the emphasis it places on engaging students in the various arenas of politics, public policy, and public leadership.

Since its inauguration in 1999, the Riley Institute has developed a broad array of programs, symposia, and conferences designed to promote discussion and analysis of the dynamics of important public policy issues ranging from social security to national security policy. Among the most important programs of The Riley Institute are those created to promote civic participation, responsibility, and public leadership: Our Teachers of Government and Emerging Public Leaders programs, the Wilkins Excellence in Legislative Leadership program, the Law and Society Series, and the award winning Riley Diversity Leaders Initiative.

Joining Dr. Edgar to talk about the Riley Institute and its programs are Richard W. Riley and the Institute's Executive Director, Donald L. Gordon.


South Carolina’s Virtual Library: DISCUS


Friday - September 21, 2012


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About This Show

DISCUS, South Carolina’s Virtual Library is the “information place” for all South Carolinians. DISCUS, which stands for Digital Information for South Carolina USers, provides free access to an electronic library that’s available 24/7. DISCUS provides a variety of organized resources, called databases, for individuals of all ages, educational levels and interests. The databases include professional journals, reference material, newspapers, maps, encyclopedias, magazines, multimedia, and e-books. Among the encyclopedias accessible through DISCUS is the new, on-line-only edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica.

DISCUS Program Director Amy Duernberger joins Dr. Edgar to talk about this unique, free learning resource, how it came to be, and the scope and reliability of its content. Then, Darcy McCanless, Manager of Professional Development for Britannica Digital Learning, will tell us about the unprecedented move by Encyclopedia Britannica in publishing its latest iteration solely in the digital realm.

Contact the SC State Library


Death and the Civil War


Friday - September 14, 2012


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About This Show

With the coming of the Civil War, and the staggering casualties it ushered in, death entered the experience of the American people as it never had before--permanently altering the character of the republic and the psyche of the American people.

On Tuesday, September 18th, at 9:00pm, ETV will air Ric Burns’ American Experience documentary Death and the Civil War. Burns joins Dr. Edgar to talk about the film, and the ways in which the Civil War forever changed how Americans deal with death. Also taking part in the discussion are David W. Blight, Professor of American History at Yale University, and the Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale; and Dr. Drew Gilpin Faust, the 28th President of Harvard University and the Lincoln Professor of History in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Her 2009 Bancroft Prize-winning book, This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Alfred A. Knopf, 2008) forms the basis for Burn’s documentary.

(Photo:Rahoul Ghose/PBS)


Messages from Home: the Art of Leo Twiggs


Friday - September 07, 2012


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast April 13, 2012) - This week’s guest is renowned artist Leo Twiggs. His new book Messages from Home: the Art of Leo Twiggs brushes a broad stroke over the 40-year career that has made Twiggs an internationally renowned name in the world of art. It is the first book to be published by the Claflin University Press, making the institution one of only two Historically Black Colleges and Universities to have their own publishing house.

Twiggs tells Dr. Edgar that he sought to make the book itself an artistic experience by carefully selecting and placing his reproduced art in a meaningful way throughout. They talk about the book and Twiggs' career.


Reading, Publishing, and Selling Books in S.C.


Friday - August 31, 2012


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 12/09/11) - As the old slogan says, “Reading is fundamental.” However, with ever more numerous electronic media vying for our attention, reading is not always a priority for the average South Carolinian. Wanda Jewell and Curtis Rogers are working to change that through the South Carolina Center for the Book, a cooperative project of the South Carolina State Library, the University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Science, and the Humanities Council SC. They join Dr. Edgar to talk about the Center, the Southeastern Independent Booksellers Alliance, USC Press, the S.C. State Library, and the Center for the Book’s Speaker at the Center series.


Camille 1969: Histories of a Hurricane


Friday - August 17, 2012


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 07/19/11) - Thirty-four years ago, Hurricane Camille savaged the Mississippi Gulf Coast. In his book, Camille, 1969: Histories of a Hurricane, Dr. Mark Smith has written three highly original histories of the storm’s impact in southern Mississippi. Smith is a Carolina Distinguished Professor of History in USC’s College of Arts and Humanities. He is also a leading expert on “sensory history.” He joins Dr. Edgar to talk about the book, and about sensory history.


The Peach Bush Book Club: Flying Helicopters in Vietnam


Friday - August 10, 2012


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 05/27/11) - Walter Edgar talks with Col. Walt Ledbetter and Duncan McCrae, veterans of the 263rd Marine Helicoptor Squadron. Their aim is to compile a history of their experiences in the Vietnam War in 1969-70. They share stories from some of the missions they flew. Ledbetter and McCrae are joined by Clint Chalmers, producer.


Troy Nooe: Ocean Forest - Murder in Myrtle Beach


Friday - August 03, 2012


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About This Show

Frankie McKeller hates the beach. He has ever since that day on the one they called Omaha. If the guy who saved his life during the war wasn’t getting married he’d never have made the trip to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

As a low budget gum shoe out of Baltimore, he isn’t prepared for a weekend of hobnobbing with the Southern elite. When a prominent wedding guest is found with a bullet to the brain, the six week course he took in private investigation proves lacking as well. Southern tradition meets old school mystery in this twisting tale as rival families attempt to alter the course of what is destined to become one of America’s top vacation destinations.

In his novel Ocean Forest: Murder in Myrtle Beach, Toy D. Nooe takes readers on a noir ride through post-WWII Myrtle Beach, SC. He joins Dr. Edgar to talk about the novel and his growing career as a novelist.


Renovating 701 Whaley in Columbia


Friday - July 27, 2012


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About This Show

Most people looked at the building at 701 Whaley St. as a crumbling eyesore. But developer Richard Burts saw much more. He tells Dr. Edgar he brought the historic structure back to life.

Built in 1903 as the Granby and Pacific Mill village's company store, 701 Whaley, a 35,000 square-foot brick building in Columbia, S.C. has served many purposes. It quickly became a community center for the mill workers and everybody just called it "The Y." It included a bowling alley, library, auditorium, gymnasium, pool and dance hall. With dances every Friday night, a movie on Saturdays, basketball and billiards, socials and civility, this cornerstone of the community was hopping with action for several decades.


Nathalie Dupree’s Southern Biscuits


Friday - July 20, 2012


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 12/16/11) - Nathalie Dupree joins Dr. Edgar to talk about her new book, Southern Biscuits, co-authored by Cynthia Stevens Graubart. Dupree is the author of eleven cookbooks about the American South, entertaining, and basic cooking. She has hosted over 300 television shows on the Food Network, The Learning Channel and PBS. She has been a spokesperson for Wild American Shrimp, the Catfish Institute and many other organizations. She currently writes for The Post and Courier in Charleston, S.C., as well as Charleston Magazine and other publications.


The Liberty Fellowship of S.C.


Friday - July 13, 2012


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About This Show

This week, Hayne Hipp and Dr. Benjamin Dunlap, founders of the Liberty Fellowship, join Dr. Edgar to talk about the Fellowship. In 2002 and 2003, Hipp and Dunlap began the process of creating the Fellowship. The Fellowship seeks to promote outstanding leadership in South Carolina, empowering the state and its future leaders to realize their full potential. The Liberty Fellowship is less than a decade old, but its roots go back centuries to concepts of creating a just society.

In 2012, Fellows, senior advisors and passionate community members are seeking to address challenges in the areas of health, environment, public policy, education, and economic development through action groups. Though separate from Liberty Fellowship by design, each action group seeks to move South Carolina forward.


Mary Alice Monroe: Beach House Memories


Friday - July 06, 2012


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About This Show

Lowcountry author Mary Alice Monroe talks with Dr. Edgar about her new novel, Beach House Memories. The novel is the third book in a series that began 10 years ago with Beach House. It's the poignant and emotional tale of Lovie Rutledge, a strong, passionate woman torn between duty and desire, between the traditions of the old South and the social changes that were sweeping America in 1974. For Lovie, it is an empowering journey of seasons of self-discovery.


Dorothea Benton Frank: Porch Lights


Friday - June 22, 2012


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About This Show

Dorothea Benton Frank joins Dr. Edgar to talk about her new novel. With Porch Lights, the New York Times bestselling author is back home in the Carolina Lowcountry, spinning a tale that brims with the warmth, charm, heart, and humor that has become her trademark. The novel is a stirring, emotionally rich, multigenerational story—a poignant tale of life, love, and transformation—as a nurse, returning to Sullivans Island from the Afghanistan War, finds her life has been irrevocably altered by tragedy…and now must rediscover love and purpose with the help of her son and aging mother.


Piano Music During the Civil War Era


Friday - June 15, 2012


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About This Show

The American Civil War shaped every aspect of life in the South, including music. Along with songs and military band music published in the South during the war, a considerable repertoire of solo keyboard music also exists, written by white, black, male, and female composers. Dr. David B. Thompson, a professor of music at Limestone College in Gaffney, S.C., has created and gives performances of a program called “Confederates at the Keyboard: Piano Music during the Civil War Era.”

Thompson discusses the Southern composers whose music was prominent during the Civil War, and the role of the keyboard in Confederate society with Dr. Edgar. He’ll also sit down at the piano to play some of this music.


Common Sense and Whiskey: Modest Adventures Far from Home


Friday - June 08, 2012


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About This Show

(Originally broadcast 01/06/12) - Author Bill Murray and his wife Mirja live on a horse farm in the southern Appalachian mountains of Georgia, but they are seasoned world travelers. His book, Common Sense and Whiskey: Modest Adventures Far from Home, offers stories from their journeys to some distant places that are off the beaten path.

He brings together tales of treks in Africa, Azerbaijan and the Arctic; headhunters and prayer flags; liars and thieves; evil spirits and atrocious food. From Tbilisi to Tibet to the Trans-Siberian Railroad, Common Sense and Whiskey is a crisp survey of what it's like in the real world. He tells Dr. Edgar, and his readers, "You can handle just about anything out on the road with a believable grin, common sense and whiskey."

Bill's & Mirja's photos are at earthphotos.com.
Contact Bill: bill@commonsenseandwhiskey.com


Winston Groom: Shiloh, 1862


Friday - June 01, 2012


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About This Show

The Civil War saw some of the bitterest battles ever fought by American soldiers. According to Winston Groom, distinguished Civil War historian and author of the bestselling Forrest Gump, one battle set the stage for those to come. In his new book, Shiloh, 1862, Winston Groom gives a masterful account of the Battle of Shiloh, which marked a violent crossroads in the war.

 Winston Groom joins Dr. Edgar to talk about his new book, and about his career. Groom is the author of 15 previous books, including Vicksburg, 1863; Forrest Gump, which is now celebrating its 25th anniversary; and (with Duncan Spencer) Conversations with the Enemy, a Pulitzer Prize finalist.


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