African American History

SC African Amercan History Calendar Featuring James H. Salley

By B. Jamison

SC African Amercan History Calendar featuring James H. Salley

Since 1992, James H. Salley has been improving access to higher education for minority students as Associate Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement for Africa University in Zimbabwe. Based in Nashville, Tennessee, Salley works within the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of The United Methodist Church where he is responsible for communicating about the university and fundraising through United Methodist Churches and other organizations.

Counter Histories: Rock Hill

By G. Rawls

Actors recreate the Friendship 9 at the lunch counter.

Counter Histories: Rock Hill brings 1961 to life through the lives and words of the Friendship 9 whose actions ignited a passion that rose into the famed Freedom Rides, bringing the United States closer to major Civil rights reform.  The film airs Thursday, February 18th at 9:00 p.m. on South Carolina ETV. 

29th Annual Black History Teleconference on ETV Feb. 21st

By B. Jamison

Young woman from the audience asks a question

The 29th Annual Benedict College Black History Teleconference will be held on the campus of Benedict College in Columbia, SC, on February 10 at 10:30 a.m. and taped for broadcast later on ETV.  Access the teleconference in streaming format on February 10 or later archived online.  Or view the program when broadcast on ETV!

Ernest Finney

By B. Newman

Ernest Finney Photograph

In 1960, Ernest Finney began his law practice in Sumter, South Carolina, specializing in civil rights advocacy and defense. He represented the Friendship 9, a group of black college students arrested and charged when trying to desegregate a lunch counter in Rock Hill, S.C. In 1972, Finney was elected to the State House of Representatives. Four years later he became the first black Circuit Court judge. In 1985, he was appointed to the South Carolina Supreme Court and was named Chief Justice on May 11, 1994.

Benjamin Elijah Mays

By T. Safdi

Benjamin Elijah Mays

Benjamin Mays (1894-1984) was a minister, educator, scholar and social activist. He was known as the "Father of the Civil Rights Movement." 

Mays was born the youngest in his family and his parents were both former slaves. He grew up in Epworth, South Carolina, just a few miles from Greenwood in a time in history of rigid segregation. This became the defining period of his life and he longed to get an education. 

Maude Callen

By J. Johnson

Maude Callen

This episode is about Maude Callen (1898 -- 1990), a Nurse-Midwife, who singlehandedly brought health care to rural Pineville, S.C. and the surrounding area of Berkeley County in the early 1920s, continuing to the 1970s. The episode will tell how she delivered some 800 babies, and trained some 400 women as midwives in depressing, treacherous conditions. Many share their memories of Maude Callen and the invaluable medical service she provided as nurse and doctor to thousands in this low income area of South Carolina for generations.

Mary McLeod Bethune

By J. Johnson

Mary McLeod Bethune

This profile will show how Mary Jane McLeod Bethune, born to poor cotton farmers in Mayesville, SC, would brilliantly start a school of her own with just $1.50, which became an internationally recognized university. Dr. Bethune influenced important African-American Political leaders of the day, created a “Black Cabinet”, and was an advisor to several U.S. Presidents, among them, President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The profile will also feature interviews with:

Mary Simms Oliphant

By W. Sellers

Mary Simms Oliphant

Mary Simms Oliphant (1891-1988), granddaughter of novelist and historian William Gilmore Simms, wrote the South Carolina History textbook used in public schools. She was Director of the State Public Library Association and received the state of South Carolina’s highest honor—the Order of the Palmetto.

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