Carolina Stories

The McClary Family Visits the Strawberry Schoolhouse

By R. Dymock

McClary Family in Strawberry Schoolhouse

Strawberry Schoolhouse was a private school for African–American children who lived at Hobcaw Barony, built for them by Bernard Baruch in 1915. This was a one room schoolhouse with one teacher for grades 1-5. The schoolhouse had no running water or electricity. Children would frequently have to stay home from school to work or care for their siblings.

Joshua Shubrick Visits Friendfield Village

By R. Dymock

Joshua Shubrick at Friendfield Village

Joshua Shubrick was a former resident of Friendfield Village. He split his time between Georgetown, where he cared for his mother, and Hobcaw, where he went to Strawberry School. Shubrick stayed with his grandfather, Timothy McCants in Friendfield while he went to school. He left the area as a young man, but returned in 2004 and became an oral historian for visitors to the now-preserved Friendfield Village.

In this video Shubrick discusses his memories of Friendfield Village as he leads a tour of the house his grandfather stayed in. Mr. Shubrick died in March, 2015.

 

The Early History of Hobcaw

By R. Dymock

Leland Ferguson

Hobcaw Barony, known to Native Americans as “Between the Waters,” has a rich past. Although Hobcaw is best known for the Baruch family and their many wealthy and well-known visitors,  the 20th century is only a small part of Hobcaw’s story.  For most of its history, the majority of people here were Native Americans, Africans and African Americans. Leland Ferguson, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology professor at the University of South Carolina, discusses the impact this early history had, and still has today, on the land between the waters.
 
 

The Waccamaw Indian People

By B. Newman

Buster Hatcher, Chief of the Waccamaw Indian People,

The Native American presence at Hobcaw Barony is apparent in the property’s very name, said to be a Native American word meaning “between the waters.” Physical evidence is readily seen in the shell middens that line the shores of Hobcaw’s creeks and emerge as outcroppings in the marshes. Many other material remains have been found at Hobcaw in the form of pottery sherds, blades, points, and numerous other artifacts, yet much archaeological work remains to be done here. 

B is for Brookgreen Gardens

B is for Brookgreen Garden

B is for Brookgreen Gardens. Helen Benso, VP of Marketing at Brookgreen Gardens talks about this wonderful resource. Brookgreen Gardens is located between Myrtle Beach and Pawleys Island, South Carolina, off US Highway 17 Bypass, across from Huntington Beach State Park.

A is for Ace Basin

A is for Ace Basin

A is for Ace Basin. Dean Harrigal, wildlife biologist with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), talks about the Ace Basin.